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, and ask that the same be printed. Messrs. Wade and Gooch, the sub-committee appointed by the Joint Committee on the Conduct and Expenditures of the War, with instructions to proceed to such points as they might deem necessary for the purpose of taking testimony in regard to the massacre at Fort Pillow, submitted the following report to the Joint Committee, together with the accompanying testimony and papers: In obedience to the instruction of this Joint Committee adopted on the eighteenth ultimo, your Committee left Washington on the morning of the nineteenth, taking with them the stenographer of this Committee, and proceeded to Cairo and Mound City, Illinois; Columbus, Kentucky; and Fort Pillow and Memphis, Tennessee; at each of which places they proceeded to take testimony. Although your Committee were instructed to inquire only in reference to the attack, capture, and massacre of Fort Pillow, they have deemed it proper to take some testimony in reference to the operation
ddy's and Furgeson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Osterihau's division was in the advance, constantly skirmishing with the enemy. It was supported by Morgan L. Smih the First division of cavalry, at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Hint Ridge, cast of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments f attack was ordered to be made on the enemy's extreme right at daylight on the twenty-first of November, and that preparatory orders were sent through me on the eighteenth, for the Eleventh corps to cross to the north bank of the Tennessee River on the twentieth. At this time the Eleventh corps and a part of the Twelfth corps wer
er, he immediately informed General Grant of these movements of the enemy, who directed me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials that might in any way be used by the enemy in crossing the Tennessee River. On the twenty-second, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of Roddy's command, had crossed the Tennessee, somewhere between Florence and Clifton, on the eighteenth, intending to make a raid on our railroads. The guards along the railroads were cautioned against an attack from this party, and measures were immediately taken to drive Roddy across the river. Colonel H. O. Miller, Seventy-second Indiana, commanding one expedition, reports from Blue Water, twenty-sixth, via Pulaski, twenty-seventh, that he engaged Johnson's brigade near Florence, routed them, killed fifteen, and wounded quite a number, taking them prisoners — among them three commission
nk, before April next, if the present good feeling exists, we shall have accomplished the removal of the entire tribe. Captain A. B. Carey, after successfully marching through the cation and noting its topography, reached Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant, and relieved Captain Francis McCabe, First New-Mexico cavalry, who commanded in the absence of Colonel Kit Carson. A military execution took place at Fort Canby on the eighteenth instant. Private John Caulfield was shot to death by a deeighteenth instant. Private John Caulfield was shot to death by a detachment of his regiment, in presence of all the troops at the post, who were paraded under arms on the occasion. Caulfield had been tried and sentenced for shooting a Mexican soldier of his own regiment, and the Department Commander ordered his execution in three days from the date of reception of the general order at Fort Canby. He died without a struggle, his heart having been pierced with six bullets. As the Navajo expedition is now entirely successful, it is but justice to the office
hall be content. On the seventeenth day of September, 1863, the Twentieth army corps, wearied by its marches over mountain roads, returned and effected its junction with General Thomas by Winston Gap, which the latter advised to be the only practicable road. It went into camp at Pond Spring, seven miles from the slope of Mission Ridge, at Widow Glenn's house, and only fifteen miles from Chattanooga, the objective point of the recent army movements. It remained there all the day of the eighteenth, waiting to close up when General Thomas is out of the way. His troops marched that night, and before daylight the Twentieth corps started, Johnson's division leading, and when it reached headquarters it was immediately ordered to Thomas. Johnson's and Davis's divisions and one brigade of Sheridan's were heavily engaged on the nineteenth, Davis losing one brigade commander, (killed,) and Sheridan one, (wounded.) But I need not delay the Court with any resume of the operations of the
y, bringing seven contrabands and six shot-guns. You will please find inclosed a drawing of the boilers and kettles. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. R. Browne, Acting Master Commanding. To Acting Rear-Admiral Theodorus Bailey, Commanding E. G. B. Squadron. United States bark Restless, St. Andrew's Bay, February 29, 1864. sir: I have the honor to make the following report: Having gained information that a large barge would leave the Welappo River on or about the eighteenth instant, for East-Bay, with all the materials on board necessary for erecting a large salt-work, and, on her return, intended to bring back a cargo of salt, (her capacity one thousand five hundred bushels,) I fitted out the second cutter, with eleven men, under charge of Acting-Ensign Henry Edson, and gig, with seven men, under charge of Master's Mate F. Grant, to effect her capture on her passage down, and with orders, if after waiting five days and not seeing the barge, to land and destroy a
instructions for the defences referred to. I considered it well understood at that time between General Seymour and myself that no advance should be made without further instructions from me, nor until the defences were well advanced. On the eighteenth I was greatly surprised at receiving a letter from General Seymour, dated the seventeenth, stating that he intended to advance without supplies, in order to destroy the railroad near the Savannah River, one hundred miles from Jacksonville. Itter from Lieutenant Eddy. of the Third Rhode Island battery, who participated in the late battle in Florida. It is dated on board the hospital steamer Cosmopolitan, in Port Royal harbor, February twenty-second: On Thursday morning, the eighteenth, we left our camps at Jacksonville in light-marching order, with ten days rations. We marched all day, and, as the roads were bad, we made only sixteen miles, when we halted for the night. On Friday morning, the nineteenth, we started early,
officer, and returned toward Chattanooga, ostensibly to take an infantry command. He narrowly escaped capture at Cleveland, where three railroad trains fell into our hands. The rebel cavalry returned into Knoxville, arriving on Saturday previous to the famous Sunday assault at Fort Sanders. On the seventeenth of November, Colonel Foster reports that communication was cut off between the army at Knoxville and that portion under General Wilcox, stationed at and near Bull's Gap. On the eighteenth, his division, with General Wilcox's whole command, crossed the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication with Knoxville. He found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry between that point and Knoxville, and, after some skirmishing, followed General Wilcox's column to Tazewell. From Bean Station, the First cavalry brigade, Colonel Garrard, was despatched to Rogersville, to
bels from position to position, and our army entered Camden. Camden was found to be strongly fortified, and, with boats on the Ouachita to bring supplies, could have been maintained against any rebel force. Deserters who came in reported that Banks had been defeated, and spies returned with the same intelligence. Some despatches from the enemy were captured, which confirmed the fact that if Banks was not defeated he had been so crippled as to make it necessary for him to stop. On the eighteenth, a forage team sent out by the quartermaster was captured by the enemy. This was the first disaster during the expedition. On the twentieth, a supply-train arrived from Pine Bluff, and on the twenty-second the empty train was sent back, escorted by a brigade of infantry, four pieces of artillery, and a proper proportion of cavalry. On the twenty-fifth, news was received that the train had been captured, and Lieutenant-Colonel Drake, of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, who was in command, was m
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
l Lyons, coalheaver, Signal, wounded; A. J. Shiver, seaman, Signal, wounded; John Highland, seaman, Signal, wounded; Gabriel Frear, landsman, Signal, wounded; Isaac Highland, seaman, Covington, wounded; Lewis Jones, quartermaster, Signal, wounded. They were paroled on the sixteenth of June, and delivered to Colonel Dwight, United States army, on the seventeenth, who transferred them to the United States steamer General Bragg. I reported on board the United States steamer Choctaw on the eighteenth, and received orders to remove the wounded to Hospital Pinkney and report to you for duty. In obedience I took passage on the New National, and took to the hospital all except Lewis Jones, quartermaster of the Signal, whose time has expired, and Isaac Highland, ordinary seaman, Covington, entirely recovered. They are on board that vessel now awaiting orders. I have submitted, through the fleet surgeon, a detailed report of the casualties on board the Signal. I am, sir, very respe