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ble. Weary was the time, yet always calmly resolute were the heroes of Vicksburg. The sun burned them by day, and the night, instead of bringing rest, brought no relief from mines exploding and breaches opened. The first assault upon Vicksburg, May 18th, was met, said Gen. M. L. Smith, by the Twenty-seventh Louisiana, subsequently by the Seventeenth and Thirty-first Louisiana, and held at bay until night. The regiments were then withdrawn to the intrenched line, which was assailed on the 19th. The brunt of this attack on Smith's line was borne by the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Louisiana, who repulsed the attack with two volleys. The redan held by Colonel Marks was the main object of attack, and of him and his regiment it was recorded: To the brave Colonel Marks and his gallant regiment, Twenty-seventh Louisiana, belongs the distinction of taking the first colors, prisoners and arms lost by the enemy during the siege. The heaviest and most dangerous attack, said General S
ied 15 on the banks of the Ouachita. On the 17th, Banks heard of the capture of Fort De Russy on the 14th, by A. J. Smith's forces. He was also cheered by the news of the capture of Alexandria on the 15th, by Admiral Porter's fleet; and on the 19th, by the report that General Franklin was coming from the Teche with 18,000 men. From General Steele, at Camden, Arkansas, he heard that he was on the march with 12,000 men to his aid. To a man of Banks' mercurial nature, all these reinforcements en from Arkansas in time for his own advance. In the closing days of March Taylor had been impatiently expecting reinforcements of cavalry. Vincent's Second Louisiana cavalry, which had been watching the enemy on the Teche, had joined him on the 19th. On the night of the 30th, the Fifth (Texas) cavalry rode in, followed by the Seventh on the 31st. Taylor, having secured his much needed cavalry, began at once to plan a counter-campaign. In February, he had learned by secret information from
ded, 14 officers and 92 men; 11 missing; in all 153, half his force. Major Austin, with his battalion and a company from each regiment, led the skirmish line in the morning's advance, and reported for Company A, Capt. W. Q. Lowd, the capture of two cannon and nearly a hundred Federals. Company B, under Lieut. A. T. Martin, captured 33 prisoners. In the evening Austin co-operated with General Forrest. Captain Slocomb lost the gallant Lieutenant Blair and 10 men killed and wounded, on the 19th, and 20 killed and wounded on the 20th. His own horse was shot under him. He commended Lieutenants Vaught, Chalaron and Leverich, and mentioned with sadness the death of Leon Brocurd, a youth of sixteen, who volunteered for the battle. Scott's cavalry brigade was under Forrest's orders in this campaign; the First Louisiana cavalry under Nixon, and a section of Louisiana howitzer battery under Lieut. Winslow Robinson. He skirmished with the enemy about Ringgold for a week, and then drove