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Confederacy. I presume that a Court of Inquiry will be ordered to examine into all the circumstances I have narrated, and I earnestly solicit it. Public opinion will never be put right without it. I am, sir, with great respect, your ob't servant, Josiah Tatnall, Flag-Officer Commanding. Hon. S. R. Mallory, Secretary of Navy. Findings of the Court of Inquiry. C. S. Navy Department, Richmond, June 11. The Court of Inquiry convoked by the order of this Department of the twentieth ultimo, whereof French Forrest, Captain in the navy of the confederate States, is president, and which court convened at the city of Richmond on the twenty-second day of May, 1862, to investigate and inquire into the destruction of the steamer Virginia, and report the same, together with their opinion as to the necessity of destroying her, and particularly whether any, and what disposition could have been made of the vessel, have found as follows: The court, having heard the statement read
ited aspersions which have been cast upon them. Silas Casey, Brigadier-General Commanding. Report of Brig.-General Naglee. Lieutenant: Before alluding to the occurrences of the thirty-first of May, it would probably add to a better understanding of the subject to refer to the advance of my brigade on the twenty-fourth, twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth, a week previous. Having crossed the railroad bridge, and examined the Chickahominy from the railroad to Bottom's Bridge, on the twentieth, and made a reconnoissance from the Chimneys near Bottom's Bridge to within two miles of the James River, on the Quaker road, on the twenty-third, Gen. McClellan ordered me to make a reconnoissance of the road and country by the Williamsburgh road as far as the Seven Pines, on Saturday, the twenty-fourth, with instructions, if possible, to advance to the Seven Pines, or the forks of the direct road to Richmond, and the road turning to the right into the road leading from New-Bridge to Rich
nnected closely with General McDowell's right. Early on the morning of the twentieth, the enemy drove in our pickets in front of Kelly's Ford and at Rappahannock n body of his army was brought forward from the Rapidan. By the night of the twentieth, the bulk of his forces confronted us from Kelly's Ford to a point above our eral McDowell, as also to General King, several times during the night of the twentieth, and once by his own staff-officer, to hold his ground at all hazards, and prght about four miles north of that place on the Sulphur Springs road. On the twentieth, at daylight, resumed march toward Sulphur Springs; reached there at five P. Peyton's Mills on the nineteenth, pursued the retreating rebel column on the twentieth, harassed their rear, and captured a large number of arms. During the actioncentration of all the rebel forces. Iuka was deserted by our forces on the twentieth, after all our stores were removed, the wounded rebel prisoners being paroled
left bank of the Rappahannock until he connected closely with General McDowell's right. Early on the morning of the twentieth, the enemy drove in our pickets in front of Kelly's Ford and at Rappahannock station; but, finding we had covered theseeavy loss, his advance halted, and the main body of his army was brought forward from the Rapidan. By the night of the twentieth, the bulk of his forces confronted us from Kelly's Ford to a point above our extreme right. During the whole of the daJackson. I accordingly sent orders to General McDowell, as also to General King, several times during the night of the twentieth, and once by his own staff-officer, to hold his ground at all hazards, and prevent the retreat of Jackson to the west, g through Culpeper, and encamping at midnight about four miles north of that place on the Sulphur Springs road. On the twentieth, at daylight, resumed march toward Sulphur Springs; reached there at five P. M., without any signs of the enemy in our
ste and despotism. To Col. Miezner, Chief of the cavalry division, and to the officers and men of his command, the General Commanding here publicly tenders his acknowledgments. For courage, efficiency, and for incessant and successful combats, he does not believe they have any superiors. In our advance on Iuka, and during the action, they ably performed their duty. Col. Hatch fought and whipped the rebels at Peyton's Mills on the nineteenth, pursued the retreating rebel column on the twentieth, harassed their rear, and captured a large number of arms. During the action five privates of the Third Michigan cavalry, beyond our extreme right, opened fire, captured a rebel stand of colors, a captain and lieutenant, sent in the colors that night, alone held their prisoners during the night and brought them in next morning. The unexpected accident which alone prevented us from cutting off the retreat and capturing Price and his army, only shows how much success depends on Him in wh
the eighteenth, at half-past 11 A. M. Nowhere on our route were we molested, and I saw no change in the aspect of things since our last trip except at Grand Gulf. The town there was in ruins, having been riddled by shot and then destroyed by fire. On a small hill, just to the right of the town was a small earthwork, which had been but recently thrown up, and was capable of receiving three or four small fieldpieces. This work, as well as the town, was entirely destroyed. On the twentieth instant, Commander Porter arrived here with two of his mortar-boats. Yesterday the Miami arrived with another, and this afternoon four others were towed up. Commander Porter informed me that his flotilla was fired upon at Ellis Cliffs, and that it is the intention of the rebels to mount a troublesome battery at that place and also at Quitman's Landing, as he learned at a farmhouse as he came up. The boats which came up this afternoon were fired at from Ellis Cliffs, and one, the Parish,
T. C. Winfrey, Major Fifth Kentucky Cavalry. Report of the guerrilla Morgan. headquarters Morgan's regiment, Hartsville, August 22, 1862. To Gen. Cooper, Adjutant-General, Richmond: General: I beg to confirm my despatch of the twentieth instant, announcing the result of yesterday's expedition. My command, consisting of my own regiment, seven hundred strong, and a squadron of Texas Rangers, numbering one hundred men, returned that day, worn out, to Gallatin. At eleven P. M. Ile, Tennessee, August 22, 1862. soldiers: Your gallant bearing during the last two days will not only be inscribed in the history of the country and the annals of this war, but is engraven deeply in my heart. Your zeal and devotion on the twentieth, at the attack of the trestle-work at Saundersville, and of the Springfield Junction stockade, your heroism during the two hard fights of yesterday, have placed you high on the list of those patriots who are now in arms for our Southern rights.
Doc. 189.-attack on Fort Ridgely, Minn. Lieutenant Sheehan's report. headquarters Fort Ridgely, Minnesota, August 26, 1862. To General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: I have the honor to report that this post was assaulted by a large force of Sioux Indians on the twentieth instant. The small remnant of company B, Fifth regiment Minnesota volunteers, and the Renville Rangers, a company just organized for one of the regiments of this State, were the only troops I had under my command for its defence, and nobly did they do their duty. The engagement lasted until dark, when the Indians, finding that they could not effect a lodgment, which was prevented in a great measure by the superior fire of the artillery, under the immediate charge of Ordnance Sergeant J. Jones, United States army, which compelled them to evacuate the ravines by which this post is surrounded, they withdrew their forces, and the gallant little garrison rested on their arms ready for any attack. During t
Doc. 210.-skirmish at Blackford's Ford, Va. Colonel Barnes's report. headquarters First brigade, Morell's division, Fifth corps, September 25, 1862. To Major F. S. Earle, Assist. Adjutant-General: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the action of Saturday last, the twentieth September, on the opposite side of the Potomac, between this brigade and a very large force of the enemy. On the morning of the twentieth instant I received, from division headquarters, the following order: Headquarters division, Sept. 20, 1862. Colonel: In pursuance of orders from headquarters of the corps, the Commanding General directs that you push your brigade across the river to Shepherdstown and vicinity, and report what is to be found there. By command. Major-General Morell. F. S. Earle, A. A. General. To Colonel Barnes, Commanding First Brigade. In obedience to this order, I crossed the river at Blackford's Ford at about nine o'clock A. M. The brigad
Doc. 213.-battle of Newtonia, Mo. General Salomon's report. headquarters First brigade, army of Kansas, Sarcoxie, Mo., October 1, 1862. Brigadier-General Schofield, Commanding: General: I have the honor to report the following: On the twentieth ultimo I sent scouting-parties to Newtonia, Granby, and Neosho. The latter, as per report of Col. Weer, killed two of the enemy's pickets, wounded several, and made one prisoner. Those at Granby reported no enemy there. The scouting-party to Newtonia was commanded by Col. Lynde, and consisted of the Ninth Kansas volunteers, cavalry, about one hundred and fifty men, and two mountain howitzers. In the afternoon I heard cannon firing in the direction of Newtonia. I ordered Lieut.-Col. Jacobi, Ninth regiment Wisconsin volunteers, with three cannon of Stockton's battery and two companies of the Ninth regiment Wisconsin volunteers, infantry, to his assistance. Toward evening Col. Lynde returned to camp, reporting that Lieut.-Col