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and brothers in arms from Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, you did your duty well. Colonel Higgins and Twenty-fourth Ohio can boast of as bravo and dutiful officers and men as can be found in any army. Captain George M. Graves, my Assistant Adjutant-General, a brave and good officer, fell by my side mortally wounded on the nineteenth, while Tendering efficient service. He has since died. Rest in peace, brave soldier. Isaac Bigelow and George Shirk, two of my orderlies, were wounded on the twentieth, the latter seriously, and who was carrying the brigade flag when he fell. Corporal Dossey Lennin, of Company I, Twenty-fourth Ohio, seeing the flag fall, rushed to it, rescued it, and bore it off the field, as he did his own regimental colors on two occasions the day before, when the color guards had been shot down. Such bravery and high bearing as this is highly deserving the notice of the appointing power. My grateful thanks are due to the brave officers and men of the brigade for th
, Huntsville, January 10, 1855. Major S. B. Moe, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters District of the Etowah, Chattanooga: Major: I have the honor to report as directed by Major-General Steedman, the operations of my command since the twentieth ultimo. On the evening of December nineteenth, I received orders to march with my regiment from Wauhatchie, near Chattanooga, where I was encamped, to Bridgeport, where transports would probably meet me, to take my command to Decatur. I reached Bridgeport at four P. M. on the twentieth, but found no transports; and after telegraphing the facts to General Steedman at Murfreesboro, was directed by telegraph on the evening of the twenty-second to march immediately to Huntsville. I accordingly started at six P. M. the same day, but was obliged to go into camp six miles from Bridgeport, on the bank of Widow's Creek, in consequence of that stream being past fording, and of the bridges having been swept away. I marched at daylight t
quietly in camp, as the pontoon train, detained by the swollen streams, the inclement weather, and the miserable condition of the roads, had not been able to get to the front. The day was bitterly cold, and the rest which the command gained by lying in camp was much needed after their arduous and laborious service of the many preceding days. During the night of the twenty-first, between midnight and daylight, the pontoon train came up and reported. I had, as early as the evening of the twentieth, encamped a brigade (the First brigade of the Third division Colonel Streight, commanding) on the margin of the river, ready to lay down the bridge the very earliest moment that it could be done. So soon as it was light enough to work, the morning of the twenty-second, a sufficient number of pontoons (they were canvas) were put together to throw across the river a detachment of the Fifty-first Indiana to clear the opposite bank of the enemy. The service was handsomely performed by the de
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
ies in North Carolina to call on Virginia for reinforcements. As designed, ten thousand men were asked for North Carolina, of which I was contributing three thousand on the tenth. The information reached Longstreet at Franklin, and he crossed the Blackwater last night. Major-General Hooker kindly telegraphed that he had advices that General Hill would join Longstreet. The time when the North Carolina troops arrived is material; Major Stratton, of the cavalry, reported the fact on the twentieth, and I did the same on the twenty-fifth; some of them being captured. Major Stratton was correct, for Major-General Foster advised that the enemy retired from Little Washington on the evening of the fifteenth, and that the deserters said the cause was that they were, ordered to reinforce the army in Virginia. May fourth.--While in full pursuit of the columns of Longstreet and Hill towards the Blackwater, an order was received to despatch General Gordon with a large force to West Point.
Doc. 20. capture of Plymouth, N. C. headquarters Army and District of North Carolina, Newbern, North Carolina, April 25, 1864. General: I have the honor to submit the following report upon the loss of Plymouth, which is as full as it can be until General Wessells is able to make his reports, when I will make a supplementary one: On the twentieth, at seven o'clock, P. M.,I received your communication of the seventeenth, in reply to the letter of General Wessels, of the thirteenth, asking for reinforcements. As this letter must have reached your headquarters in the evening of the fourteenth, or early on the fifteenth, a reply could have reached me on the sixteenth in time to have communicated with General Wessels during the evening or night of the seventeenth. Unfortunately, the reply was not written until the seventeenth, and did not arrive on the twentieth until some hours after the fall of Plymouth. You replied, viz.: You will have to defend the district with your
his proposal is made with the understanding that the officers and men who have been longest in captivity will be first delivered, where it is practicable. I shall be happy to hear from you, as speedy as possible, whether this arrangement can be carried out. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. I accompanied the delivery of the letter, with a statement of the mortality which was hurrying so many Federal prisoners at Andersonville to the grave. On the twentieth of the same month Major Mulford returned with the flag-of-truce steamer, but brought no answer to my letter of the tenth of August. In coversation with him I asked him if he had any reply to make to my communication, and his answer was, that he was not authorized to make any. So deep was the solicitude which I felt for the fate of the captives in Northern prisons, that I determined to make another effort. In order to obviate any objection which technically might rise as to the person to
his proposal is made with the understanding that the officers and men who have been longest in captivity will be first delivered, where it is practicable. I shall be happy to hear from you, as speedy as possible, whether this arrangement can be carried out. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. I accompanied the delivery of the letter, with a statement of the mortality which was hurrying so many Federal prisoners at Andersonville to the grave. On the twentieth of the same month Major Mulford returned with the flag-of-truce steamer, but brought no answer to my letter of the tenth of August. In coversation with him I asked him if he had any reply to make to my communication, and his answer was, that he was not authorized to make any. So deep was the solicitude which I felt for the fate of the captives in Northern prisons, that I determined to make another effort. In order to obviate any objection which technically might rise as to the person to
ame for irresistibility and bravery. On the twentieth it was relieved by the Twentieth corps whichl attack on our right, on the evening of the twentieth, was one of those rare instances in warfare ot met the enemy half way. At noon on the twentieth, Geary advanced his tete de pont, and with tnk and rear of the rebel army. On the twentieth instant a general advance in the direction of Atlt by the rebels upon our right wing; on the twentieth, so shattered and disorganized their regimen the movement; yet a letter, captured on the twentieth, and dated on the morning of the eighteenth,Etowah. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the twentieth, twenty-first, and twenty-second of May, theess force, and skirmished heavily. On the twentieth all the armies had closed in, converging tow Buckhead road. During the afternoon of the twentieth, about four P. M., the enemy sallied from hi the late battles. In the battle of the twentieth instant, in which the Twentieth corps, one divis
menced the pursuit on the thirteenth; on the eighteenth the enemy was overtaken at Snicker's ferry, on the Shenandoah, when a sharp skirmish occurred; and on the twentieth General Averell encountered and defeated a portion of the rebel army at Winchester, capturing four pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. Learninge pieces of artillery. The enemy rallied and made a stand in a strong position at Fisher's Hill, where he was attacked and again defeated with heavy loss on the twentieth. Sheridan pursued him with great energy through Harrisonburg, Staunton, and the gaps of the Blue Ridge. After stripping the Upper Valley of most of the suppliend much other public property. At the latter place we got three hundred prisoners, four guns, and destroyed nineteen locomotives and three hundred cars. On the twentieth he took possession of Macon, Georgia, with sixty field guns, one thousand two hundred militia, and five generals, surrendered by General Howell Cobb. General Wil
rom November 1 to November 30   80 From December 1 to December 31   14 From January 1 to January 31 18 558 Total 20 873 Grand total 893 Aggregate of rebel deserters to whom the oath has been administered from September 7, 1864, to January 20, 1865 2,207 Respectfully submitted, J. G. Parkhurst, Colonel and P. M. G. Office Chief of Ordnance, Department of the Cumberland. Nashville, Tennessee, February 6, 1865. General: In compliance with your instructions of the 20th ultimo, I have the honor to submit the following report of ordnance material captured from the enemy by the army under your command, between the first October, 1864, and the twentieth January, 1865, all of which material has been received by the Ordnance Department: Forty-two light 12-pounder guns, rebel model. Seven light 12-pounder guns, United States model. Seven light 12-pounder howitzers, United States model. Three 3-inch rifles, rebel model. Two 10-pounder Parrotts, calibre
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