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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
with the commissioner of police, to be used in the defense of the city, and upon all who were willing to enroll themselves for military service. Under this call over fifteen thousand volunteers were enrolled and partly organized on Saturday, the 20th, and Col. Isaac R. Trimble was assigned to command them. The railroad stations and State tobacco warehouses were used for drill rooms. On Saturday night the bridges on the railroads leaving north from Baltimore were burnt or disabled by a detachres were all cut north of the city and all communication by rail or telegraph between the capital and the Northern States was absolutely closed for several days. The Eighth Massachusetts, with Brig.-Gen. B. F. Butler, arrived at Perryville on the 20th, took the steamboat Maryland, and arrived at Annapolis on the 21st. On the 22d, the governor called an extra session of the general assembly to meet at Annapolis on the 26th. On the 24th the governor, in consequence of the extraordinary state of
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
r the relief of the families of those soldiers of the Sixth Massachusetts regiment who were killed in the riot of April 19, 1861. It made no provision for the families of those citizens of Maryland who were killed by the soldiers. Loyalty could not further go. When President Lincoln, on the 14th of April, 1861, called for seventy-five thousand volunteers to suppress the rebellion, he required Maryland to furnish four regiments of four hundred and eighty men each as her quota. But on the 20th, the day after the Baltimore attack on the Massachusetts troops, Governor Hicks wrote him that he thought it prudent (for the present) to decline responding affirmatively to the requisition. About the last of April, as has been noted, the Federal government commissioned Hon. James Cooper of Frederick to raise a brigade. Recruiting was at once begun in Baltimore by J. C. McConnell, and other companies were raised in different parts of the State, and before the first of June, 1861, the First