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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
opposite political faith that the encounter took place. The duel was fought under The Oaks. The story is related that Senator Waggaman intended only to wing his antagonist, and it resulted fatally for him. He missed his aim, but Prieur's bullet was more accurate, striking the senator in the leg and severing the femoral artery. The senator never recovered from the injury. He refused to permit the amputation of his leg, and died of gangrene on March 22, 1843. The duel had occurred on the 20th. Had he lived six months longer he would have been sent as minister to France, for such appears to have been President Tyler's intention. Senator Waggaman's children were: (1) Henry St. John, who became a lawyer and died at an early age; (2) Christine, who married Sanfield McDonald, the first prime minister of Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
, prevented my advancing until the following morning. Major Dabney, in his life of Jackson, says: On this occasion it would appear, if the vast interests dependent upon General Jackson's co-operation with the proposed attack upon the centre were considered, that he came short of the efficiency in action for which he was everywhere else noted. Then, after showing how the crossing might have been effected, Dabney adds: The list of casualties would have been larger than that presented on the 20th, of one cannoneer wounded; but how much shorter would have been the bloody list filled up the next day at Malvern Hill. Dr. Harvey Black, who was with General Jackson at the time, has often told me that the General was completely overcome by fatigue, and, having fallen asleep, it was impossible to arouse him, and that this was the cause of the delay at White Oak Swamp. Such was the position of the Confederate army at 2 o'clock on Monday, June 30th. Fraziers Farm. The Federal Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
mith, Company K, were severely wounded. Hill's Division remained to parole the prisoners and send off the captured goods, and on September 17, moved to Sharpsburg, leaving Thomas at Harper's Ferry. At Sharpsburg occured one of the greatest battles of the civil war. General Hill arrived in time to save the day, but Pender's Brigade on the right of the division was not actively engaged, being under fire at long range of musketry. The division crossed the Potomac into Virginia, and on the 20th, at Shepherdstown, were ordered to drive some brigades of the enemy across the river. The enemy massed in front of Pender's Brigade and endeavored to turn his left. General Pender became hotly engaged and informing Archer of his danger he (Archer) marched by the left flank, and forming on Pender's left, a simultaneous, daring charge was made, and the enemy driven pell mell into the river. Then commenced the most terrible slaughter the war witnessed. The broad surface of the Potomac was bl