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a message from my Adjutant, Captain Dayton, of that morning, the twenty-first, to the effect that our troops were in possession of the enemy's division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first. November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up t ready, but not to strike till his return. The morning of the twenty-first, about sunrise, Brigadier-General Leggett reported, that the ene of the city. The movement was discovered at three A. M. on the twenty-first, and my command was at once moved forward, and occupied the cityories were also burned. The division rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with atonton. The afternoon was rainy and the roads heavy. On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or t their defences. At half-past 3 o'clock on the morning of the twenty-first, Geary reported that Barnum's brigade wa in the rebel main line.
November 21, 1864. The cavalry took up an advance position covering all roads debouching from Macon. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made a parallel road into Gordon. Only the division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first.
front. Two, at least, of my division commanders felt perfectly confident of success, in case the assault should be made. While these preparations were going on, the General-in-Chief, having demanded the surrender of Savannah on the eighteenth instant, and having been refused, had gone to the fleet, in order to secure cooperation from the Admiral and General Foster, in the contemplated attack. He left directions to get ready, but not to strike till his return. The morning of the twenty-first, about sunrise, Brigadier-General Leggett reported, that the enemy had evacuated his front. Soon the same report came from General Slocum, and from other officers. General Slocum moved at once and took possession of Savannah, the enemy having with-drawn to the South-Carolina shore. He had abandoned heavy guns in all the works on my front, in town, and at the different forts on the coast. Until now, our depot had been at King's Bridge, where the army had built a good wharf, and cordu
idge over the Oconee were destroyed. A wagon-bridge over that river and several mills and factories were also burned. The division rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with the trains of the corps, moved through Madison, and encamped four miles beyond. About six mile on the third day after leaving Atlanta. On the twentieth, moved forward and encamped near Eatonton. The afternoon was rainy and the roads heavy. On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroyed on the march. On the twenty-secondbut the enemy, intending to abandon his heavy guns, kept up a fire until the moment of quitting their defences. At half-past 3 o'clock on the morning of the twenty-first, Geary reported that Barnum's brigade wa in the rebel main line. Orders were sent him and General Ward to advance the picket-lines and follow with their divis
orders to destroy it after the passage of all our troops and trains. This order was carried out by Lieutenant-Colonel Palmer, commanding the regiment. On the sixteenth, I marched from Atlanta, via Decatur, to Lithonia, twenty miles. On the twenty-first, I marched to Yellow River, destroying five miles of the Georgia Railroad. The march was continued through Covington to Harris's plantation, where we turned southward toward Shady Dale, and on to Milledgeville, where we arrived on the twenty-r I arrived before Savannah, and took position on the right of the Louisville road, relieving Mowers's, Leggett's, and G. A. Smith's divisions of the Fifteenth corps. This position was maintained, with more or less skirmishing, till the twenty-first instant, when my advance entered the city of Savannah. Several days before the evacuation by Hardee, I recommended an attack in front of my division. My total loss during the campaign in killed, wounded, missing, and deaths by disease is as fo
ere I remained until the morning of the twenty-first instant, when it was discovered that the enemy ring the night. Resumed the march on the twenty-first, at seven A. M. Found the roads very heavy,int about four miles from Eatonton. On the twenty-first, we marched through Eatonton and on toward ry, in the campaign which closed on the twenty-first instant, by the occupation of the city of Savanh have since died. On the morning of the twenty-first, finding the enemy's works evacuated, we im regiment in the campaign ending on the twenty-first instant. This regiment broke camp on the fouremained there until the morning of the twenty first instant. The enemy having evacuated the cityber, to the capture of Savannah, on the twenty-first instant. By special order from corps headquaof the enemy's line. At daylight, on the twenty-first, the regiment was ordered to move toward thillery of the enemy till the morning of the twenty-first, when, in conjunction with the corps, we en[13 more...]
he other two were being put in, when it was found that the enemy had evacuated in our front, much to the chagrin of some of the artillery officers, who desired to test the accuracy and efficiency of these guns. On reaching the city, the twenty-first instant, about ten A. M., the ram Savannah was discovered near the Carolina shore. Captain Sloan's battery, being in advance, took position on the lower end of Bay street, and opened fire on her. Some excellent shots were made, though with guns oof the rebel gunboats, which had been reported advancing up the river from Savannah. During the night of the twentieth, the remaining four guns of heavy battery were placed in position in Forts Nos. Two and Three. Early in the morning of the twenty-first, it was discovered that the enemy had evacuated the night before, when one section of light battery was ordered forward, under Lieutenant Scott, who entered the town about ten o'clock; also the section under Lieutenant Freeman was directed to
General Sherman, and on the sixteenth participated in the action against Wheeler at Lovejoy's Station, on the Macon and Atlanta Railroad. Marching against Macon, it participated in the skirmishes before that place on the twentieth, and on the twenty-first, at Griffin, covering the rear on withdrawing toward Gordon. On the morning of the twenty-second, shortly after daylight, the picket of the regiment on the Griffin road was attacked by the enemy under Wheeler. Major Kimmel at once reenforcedwithdraw and recross the creek, where we remained, holding the enemy in check until after dark. After dark the whole command withdrew, my regiment acting as rear-guard. We were stationed on picket during the night. On the morning of the twenty-first instant, my regiment still being on picket, the enemy attacked the outpost at daylight. Skirmishing continued until nine o'clock A. M., when they charged the outpost in front and on the flanks, with not less than a brigade, driving them back to t
on the sixteenth, and stopped for the night in Ship's Gap, on Taylor's Ridge. On the seventeenth, we moved to La Fayette, and on the eighteenth, to Summerville; on the nineteenth, to Alpine, and on the twentieth, to Gaylesville, and on the twenty-first, moved out seven miles on Little River, and went into camp, where we remained till the twenty-fourth, when the division, with the First of this corps, went in the direction of Gadsden on a reconnoissance. On the twenty-fifth, this division haas in our front, when we halted and formed a line of battle to the left of the road. After sending out pickets, we encamped for the night. Eleventh, advanced about a quarter of a mile, constructed works, and remained until the morning of the twenty-first, when it was discovered that the enemy had evacuated, when we immediately advanced our lines. Moved within one mile of the city, where we are now encamped. There were issued during the campaign eleven days rations; the balance of rations wer
e regiment rejoined the brigade the same day. On the morning of the eleventh, the regiment was assigned to the right of the brigade, and before the day closed, was in line confronting the enemy in front of Savannah. From the first to the eleventh of December, the duty of the regiment has been the usual destruction of public property and the laborious work of crossing Georgia swamps with heavy trains. The position taken by the regiment on the eleventh was retained till the morning of the twenty-first, resulting in the following casualties: Two (2) officers and four (4) enlisted men, wounded. At half-past 3 o'clock, morning twenty-first, the regiment was in line, constituting a portion of the command that entered Savannah at sunrise. The regiment was assigned the duty of guarding approaches to the city near the canal. In performing this duty, a body of the enemy was soon discovered, consisting of two commissioned officers and thirty-four enlisted men, who were guarding an extensive
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