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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
st. Availing myself of this necessary delay to inspect and readjust my lines, I moved, as soon as daylight served, on the 21st. On my arrival, about sunrise, near Lieutenant-General Polk's bivouac, I met the ever vigilant General Liddell, commandinss. John H. Murray, Secretary, etc.: Dear Sir,—Accept my thanks for your very kind and complimentary letter of the 21st instant. For many reasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instanhigh endeavor. The engagement of the 18th was but the prelude to the opening scenes upon the theatre of the war. On the 21st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry Hay, overhauling the rear-guard under Averell and driving it through Liberty in the afternoon. Hunter reached Salem on the 21st, and here adopted a line of retreat as injudicious as had been his line of advance on Lynchburg. Though at the head of su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
's cavalry. Brigadier-General Forrest's report will show equally gallant and valuable services by his command on our right. Exhausted by two days battle, with very limited supply of provisions, and almost destitute of water, some time in daylight was absolutely essential for our troops to supply these necessaries and replenish their ammunition before renewing the contest. Availing myself of this necessary delay to inspect and readjust my lines, I moved, as soon as daylight served, on the 21st. On my arrival, about sunrise, near Lieutenant-General Polk's bivouac, I met the ever vigilant General Liddell, commanding a division in our front line, who was awaiting the General to report that his pickets this morning discovered the enemy had retreated during the night from his immediate front. Instructions were promptly given to push forward our whole line of skirmishers to the front, and I moved to the left and extended these orders. All the cavalry at hand, including my personal gu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
g on New Orleans again after their grand meeting and splendid contribution to our funds last spring, were speedily dissipated when we saw the complete arrangements which the committee made and the enthusiastic zeal with which they worked up the lecture. President Davis was invited to preside, but being unable to do so sent the following beautiful letter: Beauvoir, Miss. John H. Murray, Secretary, etc.: Dear Sir,—Accept my thanks for your very kind and complimentary letter of the 21st instant. For many reasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instant to receive General Fitzhugh Lee. In few things do I feel a more cordial interest than in the success of the Southern Historical Society. It is a sacred duty to collect and preserve the evidence of the magnanimous conduct of our people in the defense of the rights their fathers secured by the war of the revolution, and which the Constitutional Union was formed, not to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
nt not only the South, but the world. General Beauregard, in his report of the battle, says: The skill, the conduct and soldierly qualities of the Washington Artillery were all that could be desired. The officers and men engaged, won for their battalion a distinction, which I feel assured will never be tarnished, and which will even serve to urge them and their corps to high endeavor. The engagement of the 18th was but the prelude to the opening scenes upon the theatre of the war. On the 21st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why, we pommelled the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
advance. By the next day (18th) most of Early's infantry were at Lynchburg, and when Hunter attacked he was repulsed. The Federal army, of 18,000 men, was much superior to Early in numbers, but Hunter was far from his base and (he says) his supply of ammunition was limited, This, with the repulse on the 18th, caused him to retreat during the night. Early followed next day, overhauling the rear-guard under Averell and driving it through Liberty in the afternoon. Hunter reached Salem on the 21st, and here adopted a line of retreat as injudicious as had been his line of advance on Lynchburg. Though at the head of superior numbers, he declined to return down the Valley from fear of flank attacks, and decided to retreat through the mountains into West Virginia, by the shortest route. This retreat was really a flight, McCausland dashed in and captured eight of his guns. The Federal army hurried on almost in panic. Mr. Pond says: The retreat was continued through New Castle with the