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our arrival at Falmouth, could have been readily moved overland in time for our purposes in perfect safety, as they would all the time have been between our army and the Potomac River, and had they started from Washington at the promised time they would have certainly reached Stafford Court House as soon as the advance of General Franklin's grand division, and from that point they could have been forwarded by his teams to Falmouth, if the teams from Washington had needed rest. On the twenty-second not hearing from these trains, I sent a report to General Halleck. It appeared afterward that no supplies had been started overland as suggested in my plan of operations; and the pontoon train did not leave Washington until the afternoon of the nine-teenth--two days after the arrival of the advance of the army at Falmouth, and five days after the arrival of the pontoons in Washington from the Upper Potomac. From the report of Colonel Spaulding, who had charge of the pontoons, and fro
rigade (the First brigade of the Third division Colonel Streight, commanding) on the margin of the river, ready to lay down the bridge the very earliest moment that it could be done. So soon as it was light enough to work, the morning of the twenty-second, a sufficient number of pontoons (they were canvas) were put together to throw across the river a detachment of the Fifty-first Indiana to clear the opposite bank of the enemy. The service was handsomely performed by the detachment, and quitrmit the corps to continue the pursuit. After crossing the river I moved the corps a mile out of the town of Columbia, which stands on the southern bank of the river, and encamped it for the remainder of the night. During the evening of the twenty-second, the commanding General informed me that he wished the pursuit continued by the Fourth corps and the cavalry conjointly, so soon as the cavalry had crossed the river; that he wished the Fourth corps to press down the turnpike road, and the ca
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
erence was in front of you at Suffolk. That with the limited force under your command you should have held in check and defeated the designs of such superior numbers, is a fact of which you may well be proud, and is the most practical proof of your own skill and the gallantry of your troops. Very respectfully yours, (Signed) George G. Meade, Major-General. Army of Georgia, headquarters left wing, Savannah, Ga., January 1, 1865. My Dear General: Your esteemed favor of the twenty-second ultimo, has just come to hand. I was fully convinced, at the battle of Chancellorsville, that the force of the enemy did not exceed fifty thousand men, of all arms, and was satisfied at the time that but a small portion of Longstreet's command was in our front. I believe that the force of the enemy in your front, at Suffolk, far exceeded your own ; and I think the gratitude of the nation is due to you and your gallant army for the important services performed at that point. I am, Gene
pted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressed a communication to Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy of my letter to you of the tenth instant. I now respectfully ask you to state in writing whether you have any reply to either of said communications; and, if not, whether you have any reason to give why no reply has been made? Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro Ould, Agent of Exchange. In a short time I received the following response, to wit: fl
pted by your Government. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro. Ould, Agent of Exchange. On the afternoon of the thirtieth August, I was notified that the flag-of-truce steamer had again appeared at Varina. On the following day I sent to Major Mulford the following note, to wit: Richmond, Va., August 31, 1864. Major John E. Mulford, Assistant Agent of Exchange: sir: On the tenth of this month I addressed you a communication, to which I have received no answer. On the twenty-second I also addressed a communication to Major-General E. A. Hitchcock, United States Commissioner of Exchange, enclosing a copy of my letter to you of the tenth instant. I now respectfully ask you to state in writing whether you have any reply to either of said communications; and, if not, whether you have any reason to give why no reply has been made? Respectfully, your obedient servant, Ro Ould, Agent of Exchange. In a short time I received the following response, to wit: fl
eclipsed us in this extraordinary race. You know, Chaplain, I keep a fast horse, and am a pretty fast man, but I am compelled to admit that both horse and rider were distanced this time. I am, dear sir, Very truly yours, L. Dyer, Surgeon Eighty-first Illinois. Colonel McMillen's letter. headquarters, First brigade, First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Moscow, Tenn., June 24, 1864. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the twenty-second instant, requesting me to give you a statement in writing, setting forth my views of the causes of our defeat at Brice's cross-roads, my knowledge of your general management of the campaign, and whether or not, in my opinion, you were to blame for the failure of the expedition, and if so, to what extent. I respectfully submit the following statement: First--As to the causes of the defeat. In my opinion, they are to be sought in the nature of the campaign you were charged with conduc
ghting of General Butterfield's division (Third) on the twenty-second, it turns out, was more severe than at first supposed. the south and east along the old Sandtown road. On the twenty-second General Hooker had advanced his line, with General Schom Atlanta of about four miles. On the morning of the twenty-second, somewhat to my surprise, this whole line was found abal McPherson had left me, viz., about 12:30 P. M. of the twenty-second, his Adjutant-General, Lieutenant Colonel Clark, rode ueneral Logan on this occasion was conspicuous as on the twenty-second, his corps being chiefly engaged; but General Howard haed by a circuit north and east, reaching Decatur on the twenty-second. After an interview with General Kilpatrick, I was satttle by the Fourteenth corps. In the battle of the twenty-second instant the total Union loss in killed, wounded and missingur right at Peachtree Creek, and lost. Again, on the twenty-second, he struck our extreme left, and was severely punished;
e, to bring from it all available forces, leaving only enough to secure what had been gained; and accordingly, on the twenty-second, I directed that they be sent forward, under command of Major-General W. F. Smith, to join the Army of the Potomac. on the twenty fifth, near Fort Powhatan, without further molestation, and rejoined the Army of the Potomac. On the twenty-second, General Wilson, with his own division of cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, and General Kautz's division of cavalrye before it. After fighting on the twentieth and twenty-first, our troops entered Wilmington on the morning of the twenty-second, the enemy having retreated toward Goldsboroa during the night. Preparations were at once made for a movement on Golwas entered. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's bridge, on the Neuse river, ten miles above Goldsboroa, on the twenty-second. By the first of February General Sherman's whole army was in motion from Savannah. He captured Columbia, South C
longer, I would have been ready to meet him at some point south of Duck river, but Hood commenced his advance on the nineteenth, moving on parallel roads from Florence toward Waynesboro, and shelled Hatch's cavalry out of Lawrenceburg on the twenty-second. My only resource then was to retire slowly toward my reinforcements, delaying the enemy's progress as much as possible, to gain time for reinforcements to arrive and concentrate. General Schofield commenced removing the public property f On the completion of the bridge at Rutherford's creek, sufficient material for a bridge over Duck river was hastily pushed forward to that point, and the bridge constructed in time enough to enable Wood to cross late in the afternoon of the twenty-second, and get into position on the Pulaski road, about two miles south of Columbia. The water in the river fell rapidly during the construction of the bridge, necessitating frequent alterations and causing much delay. The enemy in his hasty ret
or Winnsboro, which General Slocum reached on the twenty-first of February. He caused the railroad to be destroyed up to Blackstakes depot, and then turned to Rocky Mount, on the Catawba river. The Twentieth corps reached Rocky Mount on the twenty-second, laid a pontoon bridge, and crossed over during the twenty-third. Kilpatrick's cavalry followed, and crossed over in a terrible rain during the night of the twenty-third, and moved up to Lancaster, with orders to keep up the delusion of a ge at Wilmington, under Major-General Terry, moved from that point March fifteenth, reached Faison's depot on the twentieth, and in compliance with your orders, moved from that point to Cox's bridge, and secured the crossing of the Neuse on the twenty-second. Your plans for the concentration of your entire army about this place having been fully accomplished on the twenty-third and twenty-fourth, I then had the honor of reporting to you in person, and uniting my troops to their old comrades in a
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