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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
of the main roads, was enabled to reach the North Anna in advance of us, and took position behind it. The Fifth Corps reached the North Anna on the afternoon of the 23d, closely followed by the Sixth Corps. The Second and Ninth Corps got up about the same time, the Second holding the railroad bridge and the Ninth lying between thaeen miles from Petersburg, to near Nottoway Station, where he met and defeated a force of the enemy's cavalry, he reached Burkeville Station on the afternoon of the 23d, and from there destroyed the Danville railroad to Roanoke bridge, a distance of twenty-five miles, where he found the enemy in force, and in a position from which the combined naval and land forces. Fort Powell was blown up and abandoned. On the 9th Fort Morgan was invested, and after a severe bombardment surrendered on the 23d. The total captures amounted to 1,464 prisoners and 104 pieces of artillery. Subordinate reports of operations against Mobile will appear in Vol. XXXIX. Abou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
rals. Occupying Rome and Kingston I delayed until the 23d of May to fill our wagons and replenish ammunition. I knew the strength of Allatoona Pass, having ridden through it twenty years ago, and knew it would reduce our strength by forcing us to operate by the head of a single column. I determined not to attempt it but to pass the range by other more devious and difficult natural roads that would admit of more equal terms with the enemy should he attempt to meet us. Accordingly, on the 23d, General Thomas was ordered to move via Euharlee, Stilesborough, and Burnt Hickory on Dallas; General Schofield to cross the Etowah higher up and keep on General Thomas' left, via Richland Creek and Huntsville, while Gen:eral McPherson crossed at the mouth of Connasene Creek and moved to the right of Dallas, via Van Wert. General Jeff. C. Davis' division, of General Thomas' army, had occupied Rome from Resaca, moving by the west of the Oostenaula. General McPherson was ordered to relieve Ge
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
ch stores and provisions to be brought forward to Kingston and Rome as could be moved by the wagons present with the army. My directions were to move my army at daylight on the morning of the 23d on Dallas, by Euharlee and Stilesborough; the division of Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, at Rome, as soon as relieved by troops from General McPherson's army, to march direct on Dallas, by way of Van Wert. The advance guard of Mc-Cook's division of cavalry reached Stilesborough on the afternoon of the 23d, and found the place occupied by a strong force of the enemy's cavalry, supported by infantry, which resisted his farther advance, skirmishing with him until dark. The commands of Major-Generals Hooker, Howard, and Palmer camped on the south side of Euharlee Creek, in accordance with my directions. General Hooker was directed to send one division of his command at daylight on the morning of the 24th to push the enemy across Raccoon Creek toward Allatoona, on the Alabama road, and hold hi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
battle, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, with McDowell's and Bridges' batteries, or portions of them, opened fire upon the rebels with good effect. Our line of battle being formed and the skirmishers pressing them, the enemy withdrew his forces and retired behind his works at Cassville. During the night they evacuated this position. The 20th, 21st, and 22d we remained in position near Cassville, and on the 22d sent back to Bridgeport, Ala., all the surplus baggage of the brigade. On the 23d we crossed the Etowah and camped near Euharlee. On the 24th we passed Euharlee Creek and went into camp late at night in heavy rain at Burnt Hickory. On the 25th we continued in pursuit of the enemy, and passing Pumpkin Vine Creek were ordered to support General Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 25 (search)
rt of the operations of this regiment since the 21st day of June, 1864, on which day I assumed command of the regiment: On the afternoon of the 21st the regiment acted in conjunction with the First Brigade in assaulting the rebel position on our immediate right, and succeeded in dislodging the enemy, with a loss to our regiment of 10 men killed and wounded. On the night of the 22d we were relieved, and were sent to the right, where we in turn relieved a portion of Hooker's corps. On the 23d we advanced our line, driving the enemy, with some loss, and gained an important position, which we intrenched and held. The regiment was not again actively engaged with the enemy until after crossing the Chattahoochee, though under fire nearly every day until we reached the river. July 18, we bivouacked at Buck Head and moved forward the next day toward Atlanta, encountering the enemy's skirmishers at night. On the 20th we again advanced, and after crossing Peach Tree Creek formed in lin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
r: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Special Field Orders, No. 139, extract 6, dated headquarters Department of the Cumberland, May 20, 1864, I assumed command of the First Brigade of your division on the 22d day of May, 1864, the brigade being then in camp at Two-Run Creek, near Kingston, Ga. Having no data from which to compile a history of the actions of this brigade previous to that date, I shall with this report only speak of its movements while under my command. On the 23d, in obedience to your order, the brigade marched, bivouacking that night near Stilesborough, the 24th near Burnt Hickory, and on the night of the 25th east of Pumpkin Vine Creek, and about two miles from it, in line of battle, the enemy being posted in strong works at a fork of the roads in front, near New Hope Church, in which position I remained the 26th, skirmishing with sharpshooters constantly. On the morning of the 27th at sunrise a strong demonstration was made in my immediate front
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
through the village of Adairsville during the forenoon, camping at dark near the railroad. May 19, marched at 7 a. m., passed through Kingston at noon, formed line of battle about 3 p. mn., advanced to within two miles of Cassville, bivouacking at 10 p. m. Constant skirmishing during the day. Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, in compliance with orders from General Thomas, relieved Colonel Sherman in command of the brigade May 22. The regiment remained at this point at rest until 12 noon of the 23d instant, when it marched in a southwesterly direction, crossing the Etowah River at 10 p. m., camping at midnight four miles beyond the river. May 24, marched at 6 a. m., moving slowly and with frequent halts, camping at 8 p. m. May 25, marched at 9 a. m., halting at 4 p. m.; lay in line of battle all this night (25-26). Continuous rain all night. This near New Hope Church. May 26, slightly changed position this morning, and at 10 a. m. established a line and built works under the fire of the e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
position in reserve and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 20th no enemy was found in front of our army, and my command remained here till noon of the 23d, when I was directed by General Newton to march my brigade in the direction of the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge, which was reached before sundown, but the road bhe ground they so nobly battled for. The losses of this regiment alone were 11 enlisted men killed and 7 commissioned officers and 80 enlisted men wounded. The 23d instant I was ordered to further demonstrate in my front, and relieving the Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers with the Fiftyseventh Indiana Volunteers, throwing the Twentyark the enemy kept up a fierce cannonade in the position, throwing shells into our midst and exploding them everywhere around, killing 1 man and wounding 4. On the 23d the Ninetyseventh Ohio was posted on the opposite side of the ravine, on our left, and built a work extending across to a second ravine. A portion of this work was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
d, was for some time exposed to the fire of the enemy's artillery. On the 19th the regiment was engaged in pursuit of the enemy from Adairsville, and passed through Kingston oil the same day, near which a respite of three days was had. On the 23d we moved southward from Kingston, and on the 25th found the enemy again confronting us near Dallas at New Hope Church. On the 27th, after our lines had been formed and works erected, I was placed on picket with my regiment, and had been posted bucers of the command, fell. On the morning of the 19th the enemy was gone from our front and we again engaged in pursuit. They were overtaken near Kenesaw Mountain, where our lines were formed on the 21st, and where works were erected. On the 23d my regiment was placed on picket at early dawn, and I was ordered by Colonel Bartleson, officer of the day, at 3 p. m., to advance the line. About one-half of my regiment was in reserve. I conveyed the order to the officer of the skirmish line,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
mand of the regiment. Moved forward on that day some two miles, being in reserve, and halted in close proximity to Kenesaw Mountain. Regiment in the evening was ordered to the skirmish line in front of the Fourteenth Corps and remained there until 7 a. m. the next day. Skirmishing was brisk during the night, but no casualties .occurred. Moved on the 21st with brigade and division two miles to the right, lying a part of the time in reserve. On the 22d had 3 men wounded, 1 mortally. On the 23d the regiment was sent to the skirmish line in front of General Kimball's brigade, when we were ordered to make a charge on the enemy's skirmishers, causing them to fall back to their main line. Losses that day 4 men killed and 9 wounded, 3 mortally. June 27, we participated in the charge made that day on the enemy's works, occupying position in the second line of battle, and lost in killed 3 enlisted men and 21 wounded, 2 mortally. Lieutenant Foster, Company A, was also wounded. I was wou
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