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Doc. 2.-fight on the Mississippi River. Report of Lieut. R. B. Lowry. United States steam sloop Brooklyn, off New-Orleans, April 25, 1862. sir: I have to report, that in the action of the morning of the twenty-fourth instant, from four A. M. to half-past 5 A. M., against the rebel forts Jackson and St. Philip, masked and water-batteries, and some sixteen rebel gunboats, this ship engaged the enemy, at fifty minutes past three A. M., with shell, grape, and canister, of which one hundred and five rounds were fired from the nine-inch guns in broadside, at one time within one hundred and fifty yards of Fort St. Philip. Great difficulty was experienced in discharging the eighty-pounder Dahlgren rifle. This gun is defective in its vent. The conduct of the men and officers was under your own eye. I can say with pride that they fully met my own expectation in their drill and efficiency; and although the action was fought mostly in total darkness, still nothing could exceed
or us the position of safety. At three o'clock A. M., the twenty-fourth inst., the reenforcements — infantry, artillery, and cavalry — senivision from Strasburgh to Winchester on the preceding day, the twenty-fourth, and my engagement with the enemy on the march, assured me of tn, and the facts set forth in my report of my engagement on the twenty-fourth, tended to a conviction of the presence of a large force under is regiment, and whose gallant services on the night of the twenty-fourth instant will never be forgotten by them, may have met with not worsed sixty-one miles, the Second Massachusetts skirmishing on the twenty-fourth, for more than six hours, with rebel cavalry and artillery, theions of the Second regiment Massachusetts volunteers, on the twenty-fourth inst. At about eleven o'clock A. M., the regiment left camp at Strles, almost without food or rest, from twelve o'clock M. on the twenty-fourth, to eight o'clock in the evening on the twenty-fifth. The lo
eral Commanding. Report of Brig.-General Naglee. Lieutenant: Before alluding to the occurrences of the thirty-first of May, it would probably add to a better understanding of the subject to refer to the advance of my brigade on the twenty-fourth, twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth, a week previous. Having crossed the railroad bridge, and examined the Chickahominy from the railroad to Bottom's Bridge, on the twentieth, and made a reconnoissance from the Chimneys near Bottom's Bridge to within two miles of the James River, on the Quaker road, on the twenty-third, Gen. McClellan ordered me to make a reconnoissance of the road and country by the Williamsburgh road as far as the Seven Pines, on Saturday, the twenty-fourth, with instructions, if possible, to advance to the Seven Pines, or the forks of the direct road to Richmond, and the road turning to the right into the road leading from New-Bridge to Richmond, and to hold that point if practicable. Under these instructions, wi
r, from Piping Tree Ferry to Hanover Town Ferry. We had three squadrons on picket at these ferries, and the balance of the regiment was used for scouting. We found on the twenty-third instant, the enemy were very strong at Hanover Court-House, and instantly sent word to Gen. Porter. Upon which information Gen. Porter ordered us to destroy all the ferries and bridges along the Pamunkey, which the squadrons that were picketed along the ferries instantly did. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, the squadron that were on picket were ordered to move toward Hanover Court-House and feel the enemy, which we did at daybreak, and found the first picket about five miles from Hanover Court-House, which our advance drove in, as well as all their other pickets, to within three miles of Hanover Court-House, where they found the enemy were in such strong numbers that they halted, and returned to the regiment. This was reported to Gen. Porter, who concluded to send a force up, and capture
abandon the ground he had gained on the sixth of April. I will not dwell upon the incidents of that great event now, it would be supererogatory to do so. They have passed into glorious and imperishable history, and there let them rest. Devoting my attention during the interval to measures necessary to repair the consequences of a protracted and sanguinary battle, and to restore the vigor and efficiency of my command; and having prepared the way by the construction of bridges, on the twenty-fourth, pursuant to order, I moved it to the front and extreme right of the first advance made after the battle. Halting on the east side of Owl Creek and resting the right of the division on the bluffs overlooking the Creek, we pitched our tents and remained here until the thirtieth, meantime guarding the passes of Owl Creek, and making frequent cavalry reconnoissances westerly in the direction of Purdy, and southerly, on each side of the creek, in the direction of Pea Ridge. Here, as a pr
to rise so much that it was not then fordable, so that the night of the twenty-third, and part of the morning of the twenty-fourth, were spent by Gen. Sigel in rebuilding the bridges. On the night of the twenty-third also, the advance of McDowellscupied Warrenton, a cavalry force of the enemy having retreated from there a few hours before. On the morning of the twenty-fourth, Gen. Sigel, supported by Gens. Reno and Banks, crossed Great Run, and occupied the Sulphur Springs, under a heavy fiidge. Meantime I had despatched Brig.-Gen. Buford with a heavy cavalry force from Warrenton, on the morning of the twenty-fourth, to reconnoitre the country in the vicinity of Waterloo Bridge, and to interrupt the passage of the river at that poiorth side of the Rappahannock, and was retiring from his advance in the direction of Waterloo Bridge. By noon of the twenty-fourth, Gen. Buford reported to me that he had occupied Waterloo Bridge, without finding any force of the enemy, and he did
to rise so much that it was not then fordable, so that the night of the twenty-third, and part of the morning of the twenty-fourth, were spent by Gen. Sigel in rebuilding the bridges. On the night of the twenty-third also, the advance of McDowellscupied Warrenton, a cavalry force of the enemy having retreated from there a few hours before. On the morning of the twenty-fourth, Gen. Sigel, supported by Gens. Reno and Banks, crossed Great Run, and occupied the Sulphur Springs, under a heavy fiidge. Meantime I had despatched Brig.-Gen. Buford with a heavy cavalry force from Warrenton, on the morning of the twenty-fourth, to reconnoitre the country in the vicinity of Waterloo Bridge, and to interrupt the passage of the river at that poiorth side of the Rappahannock, and was retiring from his advance in the direction of Waterloo Bridge. By noon of the twenty-fourth, Gen. Buford reported to me that he had occupied Waterloo Bridge, without finding any force of the enemy, and he did
wo guns and ninety mounted men, left some five hours before our landing; but the fellows had greatly loitered on the way, for Col. Dudley reported he was within an hour of intercepting them. The twenty-third of June Rodney was passed without molestation, but having learned from various sources that resistance to the further advance of the transports would certainly be made by guns in position on the heights of Grand Gulf, we entered Bayou Pierre about three o'clock on the morning of the twenty-fourth, and attempted to reach its point of intersection with the Port Gibson and Grand Gulf Railroad, in order to move from thence on the rear of the town and heights of Grand Gulf. After passing up the bayou some nine miles, and still eight miles from Port Gibson, a raft across the bayou stopped us. We then backed down, for the bayou was too narrow to turn in, to one Colonel Berry's plantation, four miles only by a good wagon-road. Here, at about eleven o'clock in the morning, the troops we
Doc. 157.-fight at Trinity, Alabama. Colonel Walker's report. headquarters Thirty-First Ohio volunteers, Winchester, Tenn., August 8. Adjutant-General Charles W. Hill: General: I beg leave to report that at about four o'clock on the afternoon of the twenty-fourth ult., Lieut. M. B. W. Harman, in command of company E, Thirty-first O. V. I., with one platoon of his company, numbering twenty-five men, including non-commissioned officers, who were stationed at a place called Trinity, near Decatur, Ala., for the purpose of guarding the Memphis and Charleston Ralroad, were attacked by a force of rebel cavalry, which numbered about three hundred and fifty men. The attack was made when Lieut. Harman and his little band were engaged in erecting a stockade-fort, and they were without immediate possession of their arms, which were stacked near at hand. At the first fire they sprang to their arms and commenced the most Spartan-like resistance which the history of this war, so far, h