Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 24th or search for 24th in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
stpone the advance up the river, but on the night of the 23d everything was in readiness; Lieutenant Caldwell, in a ten-oared boat, made another daring reconnaissance on the evening of the 23d, and reported that the way through the obstructions was clear. Somehow, the Confederates must have known that the time had come, for as early as eleven o'clock they had lighted immense piles of wood along the shores and turned loose their burning rafts. It was five minutes to two on the morning of the 24th when two red lights appeared at the flagship's peak, the signal for getting under way. The first division of eight vessels under command of Captain Bailey passed through the opening in the obstructions and headed for Fort St. Philip. In less than ten minutes Bailey's vessels were replying to the concentrated fire that was poured in upon them. Commander Boggs, on the Varuna, accompanied by the Oneida, had kept in close to shore, and thus escaped a great deal of the fire of the heavy guns tha
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
or Pittsburg Landing, where the little gunboats Tyler and Lexington assisted in checking the advance of the Confederates in their attempt to gain possession of the Landing. Farragut passed Forts St. Philip and Jackson, below New Orleans, on the 24th of this month, and the city surrendered to him the following day, being occupied by the troops under General Butler on May 1st. Previous to this, the Confederates had strongly fortified an island in the Mississippi opposite the dividing line betwrter's official report on the fall of the besieged town. In June, 1864, the Queen City was stationed on the White River, patrolling the stream between Clarendon and Duvall's Bluff, under command of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. Brown. On the 24th, she was surprised by a Confederate force under General Shelby, who attacked her with artillery about four in the morning. After a sharp struggle of twenty minutes the little tin-clad, with her thin armor riddled with shot, surrendered. After str