Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 26th or search for 26th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
brigade was detached temporarily from my command and ordered to General Fagan for duty. From the 20th to the 26th inclusive, my command was encamped, picketing to the front, and had various small but successful encounters with the enemy. On the 26th I was ordered to report direct to General Smith. On the 27th, the evacuation of Camden by General Steele having been discovered, my command marched to Whitehall on the Ouachita river, where Wood's battalion was ordered to report to me, swam the rne of rifle pits in front of Wagner had been gallantly held by our men during the siege, and had sorely troubled the besiegers. On the 21st of August an infantry force attempted the capture of these pits, without success. On the afternoon of the 26th, a heavy artillery fire was brought to bear upon them without dislodging the holders, but that night a dashing charge of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts regiment gained the position, capturing most of the Confederates who held it, about seventy me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
sion. On the evening of the 18th we were again in camp. Cabell's and Crawford's brigades reported back to General Fagan, and with Greene's brigade I marched on the 19th, to the Wire Road, twelve miles from Camden. At the same time General Shelby's brigade was detached temporarily from my command and ordered to General Fagan for duty. From the 20th to the 26th inclusive, my command was encamped, picketing to the front, and had various small but successful encounters with the enemy. On the 26th I was ordered to report direct to General Smith. On the 27th, the evacuation of Camden by General Steele having been discovered, my command marched to Whitehall on the Ouachita river, where Wood's battalion was ordered to report to me, swam the river, came up with the retreating enemy, and fought him until General Smith arrived with the infantry, and the battle of Jenkins's Ferry was fought, in which engagement the brigade was commanded by Colonel Greene. During this long and arduous camp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
d to do, nothing definite was ever known until after the war, when divers, in endeavoring to raise the Housatonic, discovered the cigar boat with the bleached bones of her crew lying near the wreck of the noble ship that she had destroyed. The line of rifle pits in front of Wagner had been gallantly held by our men during the siege, and had sorely troubled the besiegers. On the 21st of August an infantry force attempted the capture of these pits, without success. On the afternoon of the 26th, a heavy artillery fire was brought to bear upon them without dislodging the holders, but that night a dashing charge of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts regiment gained the position, capturing most of the Confederates who held it, about seventy men. General Gilmore's fifth and last parallel was at once established on the ground thus won, and before dawn on the 27th, under cover of the flying sap, the trenches were pushed about one hundred yards nearer to the fort. Notwithstanding this succ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
ewart's a few days later. By the 20th of November all the troops had crossed the Tennessee river, and through rain and snow the advance upon Nashville was renewed. The weather was intensely cold, and the march was rendered the more cheerless by the barrenness and poverty through which it led during the first few days. Rations and forage were very scarce, though the more needed by reason of the bitter weather. The battle at Columbia. When within a mile and a half of Columbia, on the 26th, the whole army was put in order of battle, and so advanced till within three-fourths of a mile of the enemy's works. The town was evacuated on the night of the 27th, and the the Third Maryland was the first Confederate force to enter the next morning. A section of the battery under Lieutenant Ritter, was sent three miles below town to prevent the destruction by the enemy of the railroad bridge over Duck River, but on its arrival found the bridge in flames. When on the 29th, the right sect