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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
encounters with the enemy. On the 26th I was ordered to report direct to General Smith. On the 27th, the evacuation of Camden by General Steele having been discovered, my command marched to Whiteha's fifth and last parallel was at once established on the ground thus won, and before dawn on the 27th, under cover of the flying sap, the trenches were pushed about one hundred yards nearer to the forible execution in the enemy's ranks, itself having but two men slightly wounded. Again on the 27th, the enemy charged our right wing, and the Third Maryland was ordered to open upon them. A heavy battery was ordered to the right, near where Granberry's Texas brigade repulsed the enemy on the 27th. About 1 o'clock in the morning of the 30th, Captain Rowan ordered Lieutenant Ritter to go witasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instant to receive General Fitzhugh Lee. In few things do I feel a more cordial interest than in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
ll's and Crawford's brigades reported back to General Fagan, and with Greene's brigade I marched on the 19th, to the Wire Road, twelve miles from Camden. At the same time General Shelby's brigade was detached temporarily from my command and ordered to General Fagan for duty. From the 20th to the 26th inclusive, my command was encamped, picketing to the front, and had various small but successful encounters with the enemy. On the 26th I was ordered to report direct to General Smith. On the 27th, the evacuation of Camden by General Steele having been discovered, my command marched to Whitehall on the Ouachita river, where Wood's battalion was ordered to report to me, swam the river, came up with the retreating enemy, and fought him until General Smith arrived with the infantry, and the battle of Jenkins's Ferry was fought, in which engagement the brigade was commanded by Colonel Greene. During this long and arduous campaign, fought as most of it was under my own eye, I take pleasu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
esiegers. On the 21st of August an infantry force attempted the capture of these pits, without success. On the afternoon of the 26th, a heavy artillery fire was brought to bear upon them without dislodging the holders, but that night a dashing charge of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts regiment gained the position, capturing most of the Confederates who held it, about seventy men. General Gilmore's fifth and last parallel was at once established on the ground thus won, and before dawn on the 27th, under cover of the flying sap, the trenches were pushed about one hundred yards nearer to the fort. Notwithstanding this success, General Gillmore, in his report, speaks of this period as the dark and gloomy days of the siege, and of the progress made as discouragingly slow, and even painfully uncertain. The ground between his front and Wagner was thickly studded with torpedoes, his left flank was searched by the unremitting fire from our batteries on James Island. The head of the sap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ater part of the line, but were repulsed with heavy loss at every point. The Third Maryland was not engaged till late in the evening, when it did terrible execution in the enemy's ranks, itself having but two men slightly wounded. Again on the 27th, the enemy charged our right wing, and the Third Maryland was ordered to open upon them. A heavy fire was kept up for about an hour with telling effect. This was evident from the fact that the enemy's shots were continually rising; this was a sue enemy, but returned unharmed, and accomplished his object. The building was saved, and the position held by the Third Maryland. On the 29th the battery was ordered to the right, near where Granberry's Texas brigade repulsed the enemy on the 27th. About 1 o'clock in the morning of the 30th, Captain Rowan ordered Lieutenant Ritter to go with the officer of the day to the picket line, to get the range of a working party of the enemy, about six hundred yards in front of his position. They
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
pated when we saw the complete arrangements which the committee made and the enthusiastic zeal with which they worked up the lecture. President Davis was invited to preside, but being unable to do so sent the following beautiful letter: Beauvoir, Miss. John H. Murray, Secretary, etc.: Dear Sir,—Accept my thanks for your very kind and complimentary letter of the 21st instant. For many reasons it would be most gratifying to me to be present with you at the proposed meeting on the 27th instant to receive General Fitzhugh Lee. In few things do I feel a more cordial interest than in the success of the Southern Historical Society. It is a sacred duty to collect and preserve the evidence of the magnanimous conduct of our people in the defense of the rights their fathers secured by the war of the revolution, and which the Constitutional Union was formed, not to destroy, but to preserve. Though unsuccessful in the effort to maintain those rights, the eternal foundation of truth a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
The weather was intensely cold, and the march was rendered the more cheerless by the barrenness and poverty through which it led during the first few days. Rations and forage were very scarce, though the more needed by reason of the bitter weather. The battle at Columbia. When within a mile and a half of Columbia, on the 26th, the whole army was put in order of battle, and so advanced till within three-fourths of a mile of the enemy's works. The town was evacuated on the night of the 27th, and the the Third Maryland was the first Confederate force to enter the next morning. A section of the battery under Lieutenant Ritter, was sent three miles below town to prevent the destruction by the enemy of the railroad bridge over Duck River, but on its arrival found the bridge in flames. When on the 29th, the right section rejoined the left, it was found on the south bank of the river, in the cemetery at Columbia, engaged with the enemy. The Federals on the other side of the river h