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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 52 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 22 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for 28th or search for 28th in all documents.

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ring, the gunboat retired. Forrest was almost constantly on picket until the 28th of December, when he had a heavy skirmish at Sacramento, which further encouraged the Confederates. General T. L. Crittenden was reported at Calhoun, on the north bank of Green River, with a large force, and with designs looking to an advance. General Johnston ordered a cavalry reconnaissance, and Forrest moved, December 26th, with 300 men, over muddy, icy roads, toward Greenville, which he reached on the 28th. Learning, about eight miles beyond Greenville, that some 400 or 500 Federal cavalry were not far off, Forrest went forward rapidly along the heavy roads to overtake them. Near the village of Sacramento, a young girl, full of patriotic ardor, galloped down to point out to the Southerners the enemy's position. When Forrest overtook the rear-guard of the Federal cavalry, his dash of thirty miles had left him but 150 men. He drove the rear-guard into the village where the Federals had post
. Out of this matter and the general situation in the West arose an unofficial correspondence, which has been published in part. General Johnston's letter of March 18th has been much admired, and comment upon it by the present writer is not called for. President Davis's letters are also given in full, and will be found to reflect equal credit on his head and heart. [Telegram.] Huntsville, March 7-11 A. M. Your dispatch is just received. I sent Colonel Liddell to Richmond on the 28th ult., with the official reports of Generals Floyd and Pillow of the events at Donelson, and suppose that he must have arrived by this time. I also sent by him a dispatch, containing my purposes for the defense of the valley of the Mississippi, and for cooperating or uniting with General Beauregard, who has been urging me to come on. The stores accumulated at Murfreesboro, the pork and provisions at Shelbyville and other points, and their necessary protection and removal, with the bad roads
occupy and secure the rich region of Middle Tennessee, and for that reason preferred to move by land, and make Florence, Alabama, instead of Pittsburg or Savannah, the base of a combined movement. But Halleck, having been put in supreme command, his opinion prevailed, and the joint movement concerted against Corinth between the two commanders was set on foot. Halleck telegraphed Buell, March 26th: I am inclined to believe the enemy will make his stand at or near Corinth. On the 28th: It seems from all accounts the enemy is massing his forces in the vicinity of Corinth. You will concentrate all your available troops at Savannah, or Pittsburg, twelve miles above. Large reinforcements being sent to General Grant. We must be ready to attack the enemy as soon as the roads are passable. On April 5th Halleck telegraphed from St. Louis: You are right about concentrating at Waynesboro. Future movements must depend on those of the enemy. I shall not be able to