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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 52 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 22 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for 28th or search for 28th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
, separated by a shallow bay, half a mile wide. Of these works Fort Hatteras was the larger, and together they mounted twenty-five guns. In those days of wooden ships one gun mounted on shore was considered equal to five on shipboard, but even this allowance made the squadron superior to the forts, without considering the heavier guns and better equipments of the frigates. Part of the troops landed on the island under cover of the guns of the squadron, and at 8:45 on the morning of the 28th, the battle commenced. The Wabash, of fifty guns, with the Cumberland in tow and followed by the Minnesota, stood in towards Fort Clark and opened fire, and were soon joined by the Susquehanna. The plan of attack, although afterwards followed in several cases during the Civil War,was not the best calculated to bring an engagement to a speedy conclusion. The vessels were kept in motion in a circle or ellipse, passing and repassing the enemy's works. The plan has the advantage of bother
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 18: capture of forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
ere got under way and sent to Pilotstown to replenish their ammunition. Six were ordered thereafter to cross the bar at Southwest Pass and proceed to the rear of Fort Jackson, holding themselves in readiness for any service. At midnight of the 28th, General Duncan sent an officer on board the Harriet Lane to inform Commander Porter of his willingness to capitulate. On the following day Commander Porter with nine gun-boats, proceeded up river to Fort Jackson, under a flag of truce, and upocer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, New Orleans. Navy Department. May 10, 1862. Sir — Your dispatch of April 30, inclosing the articles of capitulation of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which surrendered on the 28th, after a bombardment of one hundred and forty-four consecutive hours by the mortar flotilla, has been received. I have also to acknowledge the receipt of the flags taken in the two forts on that occasion, including the original one hoisted on For
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
, situated above these defences, was destroyed by Captain S. Philip Lee. On the 28th General Butler landed above Fort St. Philip, under the guns of the Mississippi ath enclosed, asking again for the sur render. His answer is enclosed. On the 28th I received a communication from him, stating that he would surrender the forts, lding out with any chance of success, and gave signs of insubordination. On the 28th, a flag of truce came on board the Harriet Lane, proposing to surrender Jackson which were lying close under the guns of Fort Jackson. Until the morning of the 28th, when Forts Jackson and St. Philip having surrendered to you, we were dispatchedned upon the destruction of the Confederate States steamer Louisiana, on the 28th ultimo, viz: Surgeon James D. Grafton, Assistant Paymaster L. E. Brooks, Captain's es of capitulation of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which surrendered on the 28th ultimo, after a bombardment of 144 consecutive hours by the mortar flotilla, has be
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ral order (a copy of which is hereto appended) for the attack on the 28th, at 4 A. M. At 2 A. M., on the 28th June, the signal was made to te, to make my official report of my attack on Vicksburg, on the 28th instant, and to give my reason for not following the flag-ship up the rirder, I submit the following report: At two in the morning of the 28th, the signal being made from the flag-ship, I got under way and steamhonor to report that I took my position in line of battle on the 28th instant at 3.10 A. M., in obedience to signals, and stood up the river iteamer J. P. Jackson during the engagement on the morning of the 28th ultimo, before Vicksburg. In endeavoring to obtain the position assignhe fleet was formed according to the plan for the morning of the 28th ultimo. Renshaw's mortars were now firing at the batteries. At 6.55, up with coal, and left that city at 3.15 P. M., on Thursday, the 28th instant. Nothing of importance occurred until I reached Port Hudson. I
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
wants of the Army were first considered.) Sometimes the boats of the squadron would have something more interesting to report than the capture of a salt crop. Late in February, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English, in command of the gun-boat Sagamore, received information that a schooner was in Mosquito Inlet, Florida, loading up with cotton, the captain being of the opinion that there was no blockading vessel in the vicinity. English proceeded to that point at once, arriving there on the 28th, when the schooner was discovered inside. An expedition was organized to cut her out or burn her. It was placed under the command of Acting-Master's Mate J. A. Slamm, a very young officer, but one who was full of zeal. He took the ship's launch, with Third-Assistant Engineer F. G. Coggin, thirteen men and a howitzer; the first cutter in charge of Acting-Master's Mate Frank E. Ford with seven men; the second cutter in charge of Acting-Master's Mate C. R. Fleming with eleven men, and the g
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
nced on the 30th of April. The Admiral arrived in Alexandria on the evening of the 27th, and conferred with Colonel Bailey and General Banks on the morning of the 28th, when the order was issued. Where all this indisposition to adopt Bailey's plan appears, we are at a loss to imagine. In fact, we are not aware that any one optransports were reluctant to enter Government service for this campaign. The first gun-boat was unable to cross the rapids until the 26th; others crossed on the 28th, with some transports, and others still on the 2d and 3d of April; the passage having been made with difficulty and danger, occupying several days. Several gun-bofatiguing march. At least two days were required to reorganize the different corps after arrival. Banks says the first gun-boat could only pass the Rapids on the 28th,whereas on that day the heaviest of the vessels, the Eastport, ascended the Falls, and seven or eight others — all that were needed — had been above the Falls for