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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 52 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 22 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 28th or search for 28th in all documents.

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More than a month since, the division of reenforcements, under General O. B. Willcox, entered East-Tennessee, and, with Shackleford's division, moved immediately on the rebels at Blue Spring. After a sharp engagement, the enemy was forced to retire, with severe loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home of Andy Johnson, and Shackleford's occupying Jonesboro. Every thing remained quiet until the twenty-eighth ult., when Shackleford was flanked by the enemy, and forced to fall back on Greenville. Next day, however, the rebels retreated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediately sent out to learn the result, and toward evening sent
le, President New-York Mutual Insurance Company. Isaac Sherman, Merchant Ship-Owner. W. A. Sale & Co, Merchant Ship-Owners. Thomas Dunham, Merchant Ship-Owner. Spofford, Tileston & Co., Merchant Ship-Owners. Babcock Bros. & Co., Bankers. J. P. Morgan & Co., Bankers. E. D. Morgan, United States Senator. New-York, October 28, 1863. Secretary Welles's reply. Navy Department, Washington, November 14, 1863. gentlemen: The Department duly received your communication of the twenty-eighth ultimo, in reference to the depredations committed upon American commerce by the Alabama and other rebel cruisers. The pursuit and capture of these vessels is a matter that the Department has constantly in view, and swift steamers have been constantly in search of them, and at times very close on to them. They are under orders to follow them wherever they may go. The only vessel that had the impudence to attack our flag at the entrance of our harbors — the Tacony — was promptly pursued and
's main camp in Chattanooga valley to Lookout valley. On the twenty-eighth, Hooker emerged into Lookout valley at Wauhatchie, by the direct route into East-Tennessee. Returning from the front on the twenty-eighth, I found that Granger had not yet got off, nor would he have thonal caissons and ammunition were captured at Ringgold. On the twenty-eighth, Colonel Long (Fourth Ohio cavalry) returned to Chattanooga, frirection of Dalton, and then returned to Chattanooga. On the twenty-eighth, General Hooker was ordered by General Grant to remain at Ringgring of the Second Kentucky cavalry, which had joined me on the twenty-eighth. In obedience to verbal directions given me by the commander o divisions, they were comfortably removed to Chattanooga on the twenty-eighth. My sincere thanks are tendered to all the officers of the medky, 1 22  23   Total,78086309 7529 On the morning of the twenty-eighth, we took up the march for this place, which was reached the eve<
horough military knowledge by using sufficient military caution in advancing so as to deceive the vigilant enemy, and thereby deter him from hurling his overwhelmingly strong numbers upon our lines. General Warren continued to maintain his position, although no other corps had formed a junction with him. The First corps, General Newton, which had been ordered from the left in the afternoon, reached the rear of General Warren's command half an hour before dark, and, at daylight on the twenty-eighth, they were in line of battle on his left, a little south of the turnpike. The Sixth corps, General Sedgwick, moved up and took position to the right of the Second corps, at daylight. At sunrise, the First, Second, and Sixth corps proceeded in line of battle simultaneously, but, to their great chagrin, they found the fleet-footed enemy had decamped during the night. By constant and rapid marching, our advance overtook their retreating rear-guard, and shortly after discovered the main
rnoon and the following day were occupied in reconnoitring the approaches to the enemy's work, and was attended with occasional skirmishing and sharpshooting on both sides, and occasional artillery shots from the enemy. On the night of the twenty-eighth, I threw up an earthwork in advance of my left, and on the opposite side of a salt lagoon, which intervened between my position and the chief work of the enemy, where I placed Captain Foust's battery, supported by the Thirty-fourth Iowa infanut with little or no effect. Having found out the position and apparent strength of the enemy, by your order I withdrew my advance. During the night a heavy norther coming on, we were unable to do much the twenty-eighth. The night of the twenty-eighth, Captain McAllister, of the Eighth Indiana, and Captain Hull, of the Ninety-ninth Illinois, both of whom had had considerable experience in that line in the rear of Vicksburgh, with a fatigue-party from each of the regiments in the brigade, u
constituted the major portion of the garrison. I detailed, daily, two commissioned officers and forty-five men as a grand reserve for the skirmishers in front of the works. This party were posted on the crest of the hill, about five hundred yards in front of the work, with instructions to hold the position at all hazards, should the enemy attempt to carry it. No casualties occurred while on this duty, and the position was maintained till about half-past 11 o'clock on the night of the twenty-eighth, when the enemy advanced and drove in the skirmishers. Such was the impetuosity of his advance, that he had almost gained the crest occupied by the reserve before they could fire a shot, and they were thus compelled to fall back, only, however, for about fifty yards. Having gained the position which the reserve was thus compelled to relinquish, the enemy was contented for the night; and at five o'clock next morning, (the twenty-ninth,) I sent out, as usual, the detail to relieve the res
o halt on account of the slow progress of the train. In the evening of that day, a flag of truce came into my lines, with despatches to Generals Grant and Thomas, and a mail, and I have no doubt that the bearer of that flag gave information which induced Wheeler to follow my track. The miserable state of the weather and worse condition of the roads, prevented me from moving fast, and it was the twenty-seventh before I reached Charlestown on the Hiawassee River. On the morning of the twenty-eighth, I commenced moving my train across a temporary bridge on the ties of the railroad structure, but had only a few wagons over when it was found necessary to dig a new road in the railroad dyke. Whilst this was being done, Wheeler, with two divisions of cavalry, (Generals Kelly's and Preston's,) made a rush at the train. I immediately advanced my skirmishers, and silently formed my command in line of battle, covering completely, at the same time, all avenues of approach. I then saw th
nd found Fort Pemberton evacuated by the enemy. The First Missouri cavalry, Colonel Osband commanding, went out from this point, had a fight, lost five men, and went to within five miles of Grenada; and ascertaining that Forrest was at that place in force, retraced his steps and joined the main command. Several days were spent in loading cotton, which was found along the river-shore, and after having secured one thousand six hundred bales, the expedition returned to Yazoo City on the twenty-eighth. Immediately upon arriving there, Major Cook went out with a small cavalry force, and encountered a brigade of Texas cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred, commanded by Brigadier-General L. S. Ross. A sharp fight ensued, in which Major Cook lost nineteen prisoners, and Colonel Jones, of the Texas cavalry,was killed. On the next morning, while out on a reconnoissance, a party of our troops found eight of the bodies of colored soldiers taken prisoners the day before. The clothin
arp skirmishing developed the fact that it would be a useless destruction of life to force a passage over Clynch Mountain, and the division moved down to Blain's Gap Roads, and, joined General Shackleford in the rear of the enemy. Colonel Graham, commanding the Second brigade, Second division of cavalry, reports that he marched from camp near the brigade over Powell River, on the main Cumberland Gap road, on the twenty-seventh of November, moving via Tazewell to Walker's Ford. On the twenty-eighth, crossed the Clynch, and bivouacked at Brooks's, four miles distant. On the twenty-ninth, he moved to Maynardsville, and on the thirtieth thence toward Knoxville, sending a detachment of the Fifth Indiana cavalry in advance. Having proceeded fifteen miles, he came up with a rebel patrolling party, and soon afterward learned that a considerable force was at Blain's Cross-Roads. He moved back to Maynardsville, and on the morning of December first his pickets were attacked at the Gap, fou
hird of March, on the military road. On the twenty-fourth, the whole command moved, the head of the column resting that night on the Saline, beyond Benton. On the twenty-fifth, the command crossed Saline bottom, and on the succeeding day reached Rockport. On the twenty-seventh, a bridge was thrown across the Ouachita River and the troops crossed and moved in the direction of Arkadelphia. That night there was a heavy rain-storm, and the army encamped at Bayou Roche on the night of the twenty-eighth, and arrived at Arkadelphia on the succeeding day, where it remained until the first of April, waiting to be joined by General Thayer. From the time the head of the column reached Benton, the advance-guard was continually skirmishing. Our losses were some two or three wounded, and we captured a few prisoners. On the first of April, the army moved forward to Spoonville, a distance of twelve or fourteen miles. On the second, it moved from Spoonville in the direction of Washington, a
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