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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 52 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 22 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 28th or search for 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
he advance upon Harrisburg was arrested by intelligence received from a scout on the night of the 28th, to the effect, that the army of General Hooker had crossed the Potomac, and was approaching the r in supposing that contingency had arisen, though it appears from the fact on the morning of the 28th, three of the seven corps of the Union army were in the Catoctin Valley, near Middleton, and one to have crossed over as General Lee supposed he was doing. Was not informed. But, on the 28th, General Hooker was displaced and General Meade placed in command of the army. He immediately drn near Gettysburg. Had he known that General Meade had withdrawn the corps from Middleton on the 28th, as he should have known if his cavalry had been watching those gaps, and was advancing as rapidly the one for the general advance upon Harrisburg and the line of the Susquehannah, issued on the 28th, under the impression that the army of the Potomac was still in Virginia. Not unfavorable cond
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
omoted on July 9th, for gallantry and efficiency. On account of ill-health, Major Andrews resigned his commission, and on the 21st of August, Captain John Ashford was promoted to major. Jackson made a wide circuit behind the mountains to cut the Federal communications at Manassas. On the 26th Pender's Brigade gained a splendid victory over a brigade of the enemy at Manassas Junction. Jackson's single corps, numbering less than 16,000 men was resisting General Pope's entire army. On the 28th the command formed line of battle for the memorable second battle of Manassas, which was a series of battles for three days. Pender's Brigade took possession of the bridge across Bull Run and engaged the enemy across the river. His brigade finally crossed over to the east side, but the enemy withdrew. The loss was very slight. On Friday, the 29th, the enemy changed position and was attempting to interpose his arms between General Jackson and Alexandria. Jackson's troops were arranged alo