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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 52 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 38 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 23 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 22 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for 28th or search for 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
was already informed of it. On the morning of the 24th he had learnt, through a deserter, that Jackson had left Gordonsville, and would probably attack him on the 28th. He could not believe, however, that the latter would thus be able to escape the three Federal armies which were exclusively engaged in pursuing him. But the nextve out of their positions in consequence of the crowded condition of the roads, were not even able to put their division-trains in motion before the evening of the 28th, so long was the line of wagons belonging to the general administration. Meanwhile, the work of destruction, the inevitable consequence of every retreat, was rain Richmond that this day, the 30th, would complete the destruction of the army of the Potomac. How grieved Lee must have felt at having lost so much time on the 28th, when he saw two of these divisions struggling alone in fruitless efforts against the vital point of the enemy's line; how bitterly he must have regretted having c
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
ogan's brigade from Judah's division. The latter followed the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad; then, turning to the left and crossing Philips Creek near its source, it proceeded to take position on the right of Denver. On the morning of the 28th, after a brief cannonade, Denver and Veatch dislodged the Confederate brigade posted around the house, without much damage to either of the combatants. Sherman advanced the whole of his line, extending his extreme right as far as the Ohio Railroaa and the Second Michigan, commanded by two officers, both destined to rapid advancement-Lieutenant-colonel Hatch and Colonel Philip Sheridan, who is now lieutenant-general of the army. and making a large circuit reached the village of Iuka on the 28th, where he bivouacked. Bearing to the right, he struck the Mobile and Ohio Railway near Booneville on the night of the 29th, and waited in the woods for daylight. On the 30th, at two o'clock in the morning, learning that the town of Baldwin was f
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
chief the means of profiting by the disorder he had just thrown into the Federal army, to give them battle before they could receive any reinforcement from Washington. Longstreet would probably pass through Thoroughfare Gap on the morning of the 28th, and the Confederate forces, at last united, could then strike a decisive blow. It was necessary to keep within reach of the Federal army and hold it in check, without, however, bringing on a general battle. Jackson therefore decided not to falll Run at Blackburn's Ford and arrived at Centreville. But once there, he brought his heads of column back to the left, almost retracing his steps, took Warrenton turnpike, and, crossing Bull Run at the stone bridge, came, on the afternoon of the 28th, to take position to the left of the rest of Jackson's corps. This stratagem was completely successful. The several Federal corps were all on the march on the morning of the 28th; but being worn out and debilitated, their movements were somewh
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
enough water at times to quench their thirst; they however reached the comparatively rich and populous plain extending north of Big Hill in excellent order on the 28th. On the 29th they continued their march toward Richmond, driving before them a few Federal mounted pickets. Nelson had placed Cruft's and Manson's brigades in th Gibson through Park Hill and Tah-le-Quah. The attack was fixed for the morning of July 24th. Taylor, having been apprised in time, tried to prevent it. On the 28th he sent three hundred and fifty mounted men to meet Forman, who succeeded in delaying his march. In the mean while, he proceeded to meet Philipps with seven or eight hundred men. On the 28th, toward two o'clock in the afternoon, he suddenly attacked this vanguard with three hundred men between Gibson and Tah-le-Quah, and routed them. But the Unionists fell back upon the principal column, which had had time to deploy, dismount and occupy a strong position along the edge of a wood. Just as
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
ly justify the appellation of Mount Pleasant given to this village; and the Federals found no resources in those rugged valleys, the inhabitants of which, few and poor, were, moreover, bitterly hostile to them. Nevertheless, on the evening of the 28th, they at once began to ascend the road, dangerous at that season, which leads into Virginia across the Cumberland Mountains. No enemy was looked for in that direction, and the passes were entirely unguarded. This night-march, despite the cold, w. Thomas, on the right, finding no one in front of him, approached the other two corps; one of his divisions, under Negley, joined Crittenden at Stewart's Creek on the 27th; the other, under Rousseau, encamped on that day at Nolensville. On the 28th the whole of the Confederate army was united in the neighborhood of Murfreesborough; according to Bragg's report, it only numbered thirty-five thousand combatants all told. Three brigades of infantry, three batteries of artillery and four or five
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
was the only point in that vast State where he could enforce his authority. Renshaw having declared that he had not men enough to occupy the town. General Banks, who had just superseded Butler in New Orleans, promised to send him two small regiments and a battery of artillery. These troops were expected at Galveston in the last days of December. Magruder determined to anticipate their arrival; the attack was at first fixed for the night of the 30th, then for the 31st, of December. On the 28th some bold partisans, acting under his instructions, destroyed the lighthouse situated at the entrance of the pass, at the point called the Peninsula of Bolivar, which faces the island of Galveston. In the mean while, a naval division conveying Governor M. Hamilton, with the reinforcements promised by Banks and the necessary provisions, had left New Orleans between the 25th and the 29th of December. Unfortunately, a portion of the ships, with one of the regiments, touched first at Ship Isl