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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 75 75 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 31 31 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 26 26 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 25 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 29th or search for 29th in all documents.

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annon in the road. The mortality was immense on both sides. Upon ours the returns will show about six hundred killed and twenty-five hundred wounded. Upon theirs about fifteen hundred fell dead, and forty-five hundred wounded. We could have had as many prisoners as ten thousand, but what good would it have done to take them and feed them? --Richmond Dispatch, July 29. Visit to the battle-field. A correspondent of the Richmond Enquirer says: The writer of this, on Monday last, 29th ult., passed over the scene of the battle of the 21st, near Bull Run. It was gratifying to find, contrary to rumors which have gained some circulation, that the dead, not only of our own army, but also of the enemy, have all been decently buried. In the whole area of that terrible onset, no human corpse, and not even a mangled limb, was to be seen. The earth had received them all, and, so far as the human combatants were concerned, nothing remained to tell of those who had fallen victims of
ped at Pool's Prairie, and then, turning north, to attack Jackson and Rains, and open a line of communication with Gen. Lyon, who, it was reported, had had a fight on the 28th ult. on the banks of Little Osage River, near Ball's Mills, about fifteen miles north of Nevada City. I will remark, in passing, that I had sent several scouts in the direction of Ball's Mills, but only one of them returned, and he had no reliable news. Scarcely had our troops left Sarcoxie, on the morning of the 29th, when I received news that the camp in Pool's Prairie had been broken up the same morning, and the troops had fled to Elk Mills, thirty miles south of Neosho, in the direction of Camp Walker, near Maysville, which place is not far distant from the southwestern extremity of the State. It now became my duty to direct my whole attention to the hostile forces north of me. Supposing that they would try to make their way into Arkansas, I ordered a detachment of two companies, with two field-piece