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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 75 75 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 31 31 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 26 26 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 25 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 29th or search for 29th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the fire communicating with the ammunition, therefore, it was absolutely necessary to extinguish it to make the position of the Third Maryland at all tenable. Private W. J. Lewis, of Lieutenant Ritter's section, volunteered to bring water from a branch, two hundred yards in front of the line, to put out the fire. He was exposed to a heavy fire from the enemy, but returned unharmed, and accomplished his object. The building was saved, and the position held by the Third Maryland. On the 29th the battery was ordered to the right, near where Granberry's Texas brigade repulsed the enemy on the 27th. About 1 o'clock in the morning of the 30th, Captain Rowan ordered Lieutenant Ritter to go with the officer of the day to the picket line, to get the range of a working party of the enemy, about six hundred yards in front of his position. They went within a hundred yards of this party, near enough to hear the men speak, but not to distinguish their words. As they returned to the batt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
the fire communicating with the ammunition, therefore, it was absolutely necessary to extinguish it to make the position of the Third Maryland at all tenable. Private W. J. Lewis, of Lieutenant Ritter's section, volunteered to bring water from a branch, two hundred yards in front of the line, to put out the fire. He was exposed to a heavy fire from the enemy, but returned unharmed, and accomplished his object. The building was saved, and the position held by the Third Maryland. On the 29th the battery was ordered to the right, near where Granberry's Texas brigade repulsed the enemy on the 27th. About 1 o'clock in the morning of the 30th, Captain Rowan ordered Lieutenant Ritter to go with the officer of the day to the picket line, to get the range of a working party of the enemy, about six hundred yards in front of his position. They went within a hundred yards of this party, near enough to hear the men speak, but not to distinguish their words. As they returned to the batt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
olumbia, on the 26th, the whole army was put in order of battle, and so advanced till within three-fourths of a mile of the enemy's works. The town was evacuated on the night of the 27th, and the the Third Maryland was the first Confederate force to enter the next morning. A section of the battery under Lieutenant Ritter, was sent three miles below town to prevent the destruction by the enemy of the railroad bridge over Duck River, but on its arrival found the bridge in flames. When on the 29th, the right section rejoined the left, it was found on the south bank of the river, in the cemetery at Columbia, engaged with the enemy. The Federals on the other side of the river had massed their artillery upon a hill commanding the town, and were opposing the crossing of the Confederates; the latter had six batteries replying to them, two of them planted above and four within the town. Meanwhile Pettus's brigade, of Stevenson's division, was thrown across the river, preparatory to a char