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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 58 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for 30th or search for 30th in all documents.

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one piece of artillery. John Pope, Major-General. Pope's reputation for truth is now so well known to friend and foe, and his despatches are so unique in every particular, that I refrain from any comments. Al though Longstreet, who had passed through the Gap, had been driven back, Pope met both Jackson and Longstreet on the following day, and thus speaks of the result of the fighting on the twenty-ninth in the following sensational telegraphic despatch, penned on the morning of the thirtieth, which was read with uproarious delight by millions at the North, at the very moment, perhaps, when Lee was giving him his quietus: Headquarters, Groveton, August 30th. We fought a terrific battle here yesterday with the combined forces of the enemy, which lasted with continuous fury from daylight until dark, by which time the enemy were driven from the field which we now occupy. Our troops are too much exhausted to push matters; but I shall do so in the course of the morning, as soon
ite the full and formal surrender of the city before the arrival of Butler, who was now known to be on his way. The correspondence between the Commodore and the Mayor had lasted from the twenty-fourth to the twenty-eighth, and on the last-named day Farragut vowed to bombard the city if the State flag was not hauled down, giving forty-eight hours formal notice for the removal of women and children. He did not put this threat into execution, however, but reiterated his demand on Monday, the thirtieth, without effect. On Tuesday morning, he sent on shore a party of two hundred marines, with two brass howitzers, who marched through the streets, and, forming before the City Hall, the objectionable State banner — the sign of all State rights — was torn down, and the Stars and Stripes, an emblem of tyrannical oppression, raised instead. The ceremony was witnessed by a silent crowd of many thousands, but it went off quietly; the force returning to their ships without a word of reproach or