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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 58 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 30th or search for 30th in all documents.

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-Windsor. The advance of Buford's cavalry was at Gettysburgh, and Kilpatrick's division at Hanover, where it encountered Stuart's cavalry, which had passed around the rear and right of our army without meeting any serious opposition. On the thirtieth, the First, Third, and Eleventh corps were concentrated at Emmittsburgh, under General Reynolds, while the right wing moved up to Manchester. Buford reported the enemy in force on the Cashtown road near Gettysburgh, and Reynolds moved up to thwhile our army had marched to Nashville, a distance of only a little over two hundred miles. On the twenty-sixth of December, General Rosecrans advanced against Bragg, whose forces were at that time somewhat dispersed along the road. On the thirtieth, our army, after heavy skirmishing en route, reached the vicinity of Murfreesboro, and took up a line of battle The left, under Crittenden, crossed next day to the east side of Stone River, while the centre, commanded by Thomas, and the right b
ned, therefore, to pursue no further. Hooker was directed to hold the position he then occupied until the night of the thirtieth, but to go no further south at the expense of a fight. Sherman was directed to march to the railroad crossing of the H Gap — all meeting at Cleveland that night. Here another good break was made in the Cleveland and Dalton road. On the thirtieth, the army moved to Charleston, General Howard approaching so rapidly that the enemy evacuated in haste, leaving the brineral Palmer returned to Chattanooga with his command, having in charge such prisoners as remained in Ringgold. On the thirtieth, the enemy, being reassured by the cessation of our pursuit, sent a flag of truce to our advanced lines at Catoosa, by the field of his last disaster at Ringgold. Copies of this correspondence have heretofore been forwarded. Also on the thirtieth, under instructions from department headquarters, Gross's brigade, Cruft's division, marched for the old battle-field a
h was a rough and rapid one, and, although conducted in the best possible manner, failed by several hours to communicate with or get in supporting distance of Colonel Mulligan. While Fitzsimmons's and Thompson's troops were marching toward Romney, a cavalry force was despatched to look after rebel movements in the neighborhood of Leesburgh and in the Loudon County district, it having been rumored that a rebel force was moving and operating in that neighborhood. On Saturday night, the thirtieth, Colonel Thoburn, finding the enemy about to attack him in force at Petersburgh, Hardy County, evacuated his position there, and escaped to Ridgeville, where he joined a detachment of Colonel Mulligan's troops, and afterward moved with Mulligan to attack Early, near Moorfield. How Thoburn outwitted the enemy, who thought he had Thoburn penned in, has been partially explained in a previous despatch to the Herald. Let it suffice that I now say he got away with better success than we anticip
Captain Devereux, of the Third regiment, who has just returned from Little Rock, Arkansas, we were favored with the following particulars of the recent fight at Fitzhugh's Woods, near Augusta, in North-Eastern Arkansas. On Wednesday, the thirtieth ultimo, the Third regiment was on duty at Little Rock, in Arkansas. At five P. M. it received orders from Colonel (now General) Andrews, commanding the post, to be prepared to march in one hour. At halfpast six o'clock, the regiment was marched tosouri Democrat account. little Rock, Ark., April 6, 1864. A force of one hundred and fifty of the Third Minnesota infantry, and fifty of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, under Colonel C. C. Andrews, left Little Rock at eight P. M. of the thirtieth ultimo, reached Duvall's Bluff at four o'clock next morning, and embarked on the steamer Dove. With the iron-clad No. 25 we reached Gregory's Landing at dark. Secrecy being indispensable, we took every man we met prisoner. Disembarking, we moved