hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 58 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 28 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 24 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 19 19 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 30th or search for 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
d on this day achieved, were to mark it as the bloody and glorious day of the 29th August. In a small affair the next morning I had the misfortune to be wounded with a few others of the brigade, about a dozen, I believe, but the brigade took no part in the great battle of the 30th. But on this third day of that great struggle, on the extreme opposite part of the field, the right of Longstreet's corps, other South Carolinians were to be as prominent in the terrible work of that day, the 30th, as we had been on the 29th, and to suffer as terribly. Virginia can justly point with peculiar pride to the famous charge of Pickett's division of Virginians at Gettysburg—a charge now almost as famous as that at Balaklava. The State of North Carolina should write immortal on the banner of its Fifth regiment, was the tribute of its heroic adversary at Williamsburg—General Hancock. The lamented Cobb, and his brigade, have indelibly associated the name of Georgia with Marye's heights at F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4 (search)
must need be content with the assurance, that the general in command did not intend to do, and really should not be held responsible for what he had done. One thing was certain, that he was heartily ashamed of his conduct, and that he had not the courage to correct his blunder. As, however, they had his assurance that he had no sympathy with Dennis's proceedings, and that the doors would be opened to all who had been elected, the whole House of Representatives, early on the morning of the 30th, went to the Halls—Wallace occupied the Speaker's chair and Sloan the clerk's. Intense was the surprise of Mackey and his followers when he entered shortly afterwards and found the Speaker's chair occupied. He demanded it as his right. His demand was refused. He then sent to inform the Governor that the Legislature was invaded by a body of strangers, who were obstructing them in their legitimate work. No satisfactory answer came, and Mackey put a chair by the side of the Speaker and call
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Honey Hill. (search)
e they landed, and thus the golden opportunity was suffered to pass unimproved. Colonel Colcock arrived at Grahamville about seven o'clock on the morning of the 30th, and an hour afterwards General Smith, with his leading brigade, was on the ground. Advices were received that the Federal column, marching up the Honey Hill roadd having been for many hours without food, General Smith did not deem it best to pursue. The retreat of the enemy was effected during the evening and night of the 30th, and the next morning found the remnant of General Hatch's army behind its breastworks near Boyd's landing, covered by the protecting batteries of the Federal gunbg a time successfully resisted the determined and oft-repeated efforts of largely superior attacking forces. The enemy having been thoroughly beaten back on the 30th, and Confederate reinforcements having, during the afternoon of that day and the morning of the 1st of December, concentrated at Grahamville in numbers sufficient
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel J. R. Hagood, First S. C. Volunteers, of campaign of 1864. (search)
rmishing ensued, but my regiment was not regularly engaged. My losses in the aggregate amounted to three (3) men wounded, and one (1) officer and, eighteen (18) men missing. On the 23d August we returned to Petersburg, and were engaged until the 20th September in throwing up field-works in its vicinity. On that day the enemy attacked Battery Harrison, near Chaffin's Bluff, and carried it by storm. We were immediately ordered to that point, and arrived on the 29th. On the morning of the 30th, preparations were made to regain the fort which lasted until midday, when the attack began. We were then a thousand (1,000) yards from the point to be carried. Immediately the regiment on my left began to double-quick, which soon increased to a run, thus exhausting the men and wasting their energies at a time when both should have been economized for the struggle on the parapet. I was opposed to this; but believing it to be an order, acquiesced. The enemy shortly opened fire on us, whic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of Colonel J. P. Simmes's operations from June 2d, 1864, to December, 1864. (search)
llery. Here I halted the brigade, thinking it not prudent to advance further, when the Major-General brought up the remainder of the division, and ordered an advance. By this time the enemy had retreated hastily in the direction of Charlestown. In this affair we lost a few men wounded, and one or two killed. After this, we moved on to Charlestown, the enemy falling back to Harpers Ferry. We remained at Charlestown a few days. The skirmish line was engaged slightly near Charlestown on the 30th. On the 31st the brigade, with others of the division, moved back in the direction of Winchester. On September 3d we left Winchester and moved towards Berryville, arriving near Berryville a little before sunset in the evening. The enemy being immediately in our front, line of battle was formed by order of the Major-General, in conjunction with the other brigades of the division, and an attack made upon their lines. Our men moved forward with great spirit and gallantry. The enemy only hel