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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations against Newbern in 1864. (search)
de of the Neuse river — with this three pieces of artillery,--Whitford's regiment, and three hundred cavalry. He was to have attacked, if practicable, Fort Anderson --Barrington's. Commander Wood, of the navy, with his boat party, left on the 31st ultimo, and I, with Hoke's brigade, three regiments of Corse's and two of Clingman's brigade, five rifle pieces, five Napoleons, and thirty cavalry, started on the evening of the 30th ultimo. The attack was to have been made simultaneously by the ement likely to create suspicion. At daylight on the 30th the troops commenced the movement and bivouaced that night on the Trent, after a march of eighteen (18) miles. The cavalry were advanced during the night and collected at Trenton. On the 31st, Colonel Baker, with his regiment, was detached and ordered to move by a circuitous route so as to reach the railroad at or near Croatan, ten miles below Newbern, and having destroyed the track and telegraph line, to follow up the railroad and cap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
eutenant I. M. Grimsley, Company K. Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. On the 27th we left Anderson's and bivouaced that night near Ashland. Next morning we resumed our march at 3 o'clock and camped that afternoon near Shady Grove church, where we remained until the afternoon of the 29th, when we were ordered back a short distance and bivouaced for the night near Atlee's. Next morning we formed line of battle on the right of McGowan and intrenched near the railroad. On the 31st we were ordered to Storr's (or Stowe's) farm, on the Tottapottamoi creek, near Pole Green church, where we relieved Wofford's brigade. We were here engaged in very heavy skirmishing all that day, besides being subjected to a terrible artillery fire, losing about twenty killed and wounded. On the 1st of June we moved back and built a new line of works, the old one being held by a strong line of skirmishers. Supports Wharton's brigade at Turkey Ridge. Next day we marched to Cold Har
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. (search)
Action at Storr's farm on Tottapottamoi Creek. On the 27th we left Anderson's and bivouaced that night near Ashland. Next morning we resumed our march at 3 o'clock and camped that afternoon near Shady Grove church, where we remained until the afternoon of the 29th, when we were ordered back a short distance and bivouaced for the night near Atlee's. Next morning we formed line of battle on the right of McGowan and intrenched near the railroad. On the 31st we were ordered to Storr's (or Stowe's) farm, on the Tottapottamoi creek, near Pole Green church, where we relieved Wofford's brigade. We were here engaged in very heavy skirmishing all that day, besides being subjected to a terrible artillery fire, losing about twenty killed and wounded. On the 1st of June we moved back and built a new line of works, the old one being held by a strong line of skirmishers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
e reputation who says: Sherman's recent attempts to relieve himself of the odium of the burning of Columbia, furnish the best evidence of returning virtue I have seen in the man. What Confederate battery fired the last gun at Appomattox C. H.? A correspondent having given this honor to the battery then commanded by the gallant Major Jas. D. Cumming, of North Carolina, he wrote at once the following manly disclaimer: New York, April 5th, 1881. Editor Review:--In your issue of 31st ult. I note a communication signed Confederate, which unjustly claims for my old battery the distinguished honor of firing the last shot in the army of Northern Virginia. Your correspondent is mistaken. This honor has never been claimed by myself or any member of the battery as far as I know, and I think it an act of justice to correct any such impression. While the old battery was more than once named in general orders and frequently complimented by Generals Beauregard, Hoke, Pettigrew an