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midable in numbers, so thoroughly equipped in material, so confident of success, Banks himself was beginning to be dubious of seeing Steele's 12,000 men from Arkansas in time for his own advance. In the closing days of March Taylor had been impatiently expecting reinforcements of cavalry. Vincent's Second Louisiana cavalry, which had been watching the enemy on the Teche, had joined him on the 19th. On the night of the 30th, the Fifth (Texas) cavalry rode in, followed by the Seventh on the 31st. Taylor, having secured his much needed cavalry, began at once to plan a counter-campaign. In February, he had learned by secret information from the city of the probable Federal plan of campaign. A. J. Smith was to bring from Vicksburg his division of veterans, while Banks was to march up through that Teche country which Taylor knew so well. He at once notified Gen. Kirby Smith of his suspicions. It was then that Smith, to meet this movement, began to draw in his forces, which were much
d by his colors with steadiness, contesting every inch of the strange ground upon which chance had opportunely placed him. The Washington artillery, Fifth company, rendered distinguished service during the two days. As early as December 29th, two rifled guns were in position near the river, under the command of Lieut. J. A. Chalaron, who occupied that dangerous point during Tuesday and Wednesday, exposed to a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries and frequent assaults of his infantry. On the 31st, Vaught, with his remaining guns, supported Adams, continuing an effective fire on the enemy during the day. Then returning to the east side of the river, they followed Breckinridge in the charge on the 2d, and galloping up a hill, were in action till ammunition failed. While wait. ing for a new supply, the enemy swarmed about them, pouring in volley after volley at fifty yards. Then, after the last regiment and last battery were from the field, the Fifth company grimly retired in perfect l