Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 31st or search for 31st in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
certain of the range. He called the cannoneers, who were asleep, to the guns, and opened upon the intruders, who ceased working, and did not return to that place again. It was a calm, starlight night, no breeze was stirring, and the booming of the Napoleon guns was echoed and re-echoed among the distant hills. The infantry, who lay in the ditches, were aroused from their slumbers by the sudden firing, and sprang up at once along the line, muskets in hand, and ready for action. On the 31st, Corporal Thomas Jones was killed by a random picket shot, and Private A. Lee wounded by the same ball. These men belonged to first detachment of the battery, the same that had suffered so severely at the battle of Resaca. The body of Corporal Jones was buried on a small ridge three hundred yards in rear of the line, and Lieutenant Ritter cut his name on a small piece of board, and placed it at the head of the grave. Early in the afternoon of the same day, Lieutenant Ritter went to a spr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
certain of the range. He called the cannoneers, who were asleep, to the guns, and opened upon the intruders, who ceased working, and did not return to that place again. It was a calm, starlight night, no breeze was stirring, and the booming of the Napoleon guns was echoed and re-echoed among the distant hills. The infantry, who lay in the ditches, were aroused from their slumbers by the sudden firing, and sprang up at once along the line, muskets in hand, and ready for action. On the 31st, Corporal Thomas Jones was killed by a random picket shot, and Private A. Lee wounded by the same ball. These men belonged to first detachment of the battery, the same that had suffered so severely at the battle of Resaca. The body of Corporal Jones was buried on a small ridge three hundred yards in rear of the line, and Lieutenant Ritter cut his name on a small piece of board, and placed it at the head of the grave. Early in the afternoon of the same day, Lieutenant Ritter went to a spr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
n, recently deceased, we received instructions that by early dawn the next morning the left under Hardee (he and Polk being the two corps commanders) would begin the attack, conforming elbows to the right in their advance, the right of our brigade, resting on the Franklin turnpike, to be the pivot. The balance of the army to our right, being part of Polk's and the entire force of Breckinridge, to remain stationary and await results. As the first signs of day appeared on the morning of the 31st, being the last of the year 1862, the occasional shots of the picket line were superceded by the more rapid discharge of advancing skirmishers on the left, which in time was replaced by the sharp and ever-increasing rattle of musketry, growing nearer and still louder as the loud boom of artillery united its volume of sound to the already soul-inspiring cauticle of death, till anon the surging of the line reached us and our time came to forward with our comrades. A few hours told the tale, an