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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
xpedition then made a demonstration two hundred miles up the river. Later in the year a combined expedition, also under Steedman and Brannan, made an unsuccessful attempt to destroy the bridge over the Pocotaligo River in South Carolina. The first month of the year 1863 witnessed two serious disasters in the South Atlantic squadron. Toward the close of the month the force in Stono Inlet was composed of the Commodore McDonough, Lieutenant-Commander George Bacon, and the Isaac Smith, Acting-ve offensive movement against Charleston. The history of the projected attack on Charleston is given by Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers in a following article. The great broadside iron-clad New Ironsides had already arrived at Port Royal, and during January and February several monitors joined the station. The original Monitor, sent down for the same purpose at the close of December, had foundered off Hatteras, as already related. [See Vol. I., p. 745.] The Montauk and Passaic had reached their
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
South Atlantic blockading squadron. (January-July, 1863.) Rear-Admiral S. F. Du Pont, commanding. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, Chief-of-Staff. Screw-frigate. Wabash, Com. T. G. Corbin, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 1 10-inch, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 42 9-inch. Screw-sloops. Pawnee, Com. G. B. Balch, 8 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren; Canandaigua, Capt. J. F. Green, 2 11-inch pivot, 1 150-pounder Parrott pivot, 3 20-pounder Parrotts, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers, 2 12-pounder S. B. howitzers; Housatonic, Capt. W. R. Taylor, 1 11-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 3 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder S. B. howitzer, 1 12-pounder rifle howitzer; Mohawk, Com. A. K. Hughes, 6 32-pounders, 1 24-pounder S. B., 1 12-pounder howitzer. Side-wheel steamer. Powhatan, Capt. S. W. Gordon, Capt. Charles Steedman, 7 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 11-inch pivot. Gun-boats. Wissahickon, Lieut.-Com. J. L. Davis, 1 150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-pou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
m of the war. Hood's losses were 15,000 men to Thomas's 3057. Therefore at the end of the year 1864 the conflict at the West was concluded, leaving nothing to be considered in the grand game of war but Lee's army, held by Grant in Richmond, and the Confederate detachments at Mobile and along the sea-board north of Savannah. Of course Charleston, ever arrogant, felt secure; but it was regarded by us as a dead cock in the pit, and fell of itself when its inland communications were cut. In January Fort Fisher was captured by a detachment from the Army of the Potomac, aided by Admiral Porter's fleet, and Wilmington was occupied by Schofield, who had been brought by Grant from Nashville to Washington and sent down the Atlantic coast to prepare for Sherman's coming to Goldsboro‘, North Carolina,--all converging on Richmond. Preparatory to the next move, General Howard was sent from Savannah to secure Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, as a point of departure for the north, and General Sl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ol. James Redfield, Col. H. J. B. Cummings, Maj. Joseph M. Griffiths, Lieut.-Col. James Redfield. Artillery, Maj. William H. Ross, chief of corps artillery. Capt. Frederick Welker: B, 1st Mich. (at Rome from May 22d), Capt. A. F. R. Arndt; H, 1st Mo., Lieut. Andrew T. Blodgett. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. James C. Veatch, Brig.-Gen. John W. Fuller, Brig.-Gen. Thomas E. G. Ransom, Brig.-Gen. J. W. Fuller. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John W. Fuller, Col. John Morrill, Lieut.-Col. Henry T. Mc Sanders, Capt. Crandall W. Williams. Artillery, Capt. Edward Spear, Jr., Capt. William Z. Clayton : F, 2d Ill., Lieut. Walter H. Powell, Lieut. George R. Richardson, Lieut. Wendolin Meyer; 1st Minn., Capt. W. Z. Clayton, Lieut. Henry Hunter; C, 1st Mo. (at Allatoona and Kenesaw), Capt. John L. Matthaei; 10th Ohio (at Kenesaw from July llth), Capt. Francis Seaman; 15th Ohio, Lieut. James Burdick. Army of the Ohio (Twenty-third Corps), Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox (tem
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Mississippi flotilla in the Red River expedition. (search)
Act. V. Lieutenant E. Morgan, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 2 12-pounder rifled howitzers, 2 30-pounder Parrotts. Juliet, Acting Master J. S. Watson, 6 24-pounder S. B. howitzers. Other vessels. Lexington, Lieut. George M. Bache, 4 8-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 1 32-pounder. Black Hawk (flag-ship), Lieut.-Com. K. R. Breese, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 8 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 2 12-pounder rifled howitzers, 112-pounder S. B. howitzer, 2 Union repeating guns, 1 Parmenter battery gun. Benefit (naval transport), Lieut.-Com. S. W. Terry. Covington, Act. V. Lieut. George P. Lord, 4 24-pounder howitzers, 1 2-pounder howitzer, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles. Ouachita, Lieut.-Com. Byron Wilson, 5 30-pounder Parrotts, 18 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 15 12-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 12-pounder rifled howitzer. Fort Hindman, Act. V. Lieut. John Pearce, 6 8-inch, 1 12-pounder howitzer. On the Mississippi River hospital-boat D. A. January. from a War-time sketch.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
eut.-Col. Jonathan Merriam; 178th N. Y., Col. Edward Wehler. Artillery: 3d Ind., Capt. James M. Cockefair; 9th Ind., Capt. George R. Brown. Seventeenth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. T. Kilby Smith. First Brigade, Col. Jonathan B. Moore: 41st Ill., Lieut.-Col. John H. Nale; 3d Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James Tullis; 33d Wis., Maj. Horatio H. Virgin. Second Brigade, Col. Lyman M. Ward: 81st Ill., Col. Andrew W. Rogers; 95th Ill., Col. Thos. W. Humphrey; 14th Wis., Capt. C. M. G. Mansfield. Artillery: M, 1st Mo., Lieut. John H. Tiemeyer. Nineteenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. William B. Franklin Also commanded the troops engaged at the battles of Sabine Cross-roads and Pleasant Hill. (w), Brig.-Gen. William H. Emory. first division, Brig.-Gen. William H. Emory, Brig.-Gen. J. W. McMillan. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Dwight, Jr., Col. Geo. L. Beal: 29th Me., Col. George L. Beal; 114th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Henry B. Morse; 116th N. Y., Col. George M. Love; 153d N. Y., Col. Edwin P. Davis; 161st
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in Arkansas, April 20, 1864. (search)
.-Col. Adolph Dengler; 40th Iowa, Col. John A. Garrett; 27th Wis., Col. Conrad Krez. Artillery: Ill. Battery, Capt. T. F. Vaughn; 3d Iowa, Lieut. M. C. Wright; K, 1st Mo., Capt. James Marr; E, 2d Mo., Lieut. Charles Peetz. frontier division, Brig.-Gen. John M. Thayer. First Brigade, Col. John Edwards: 1st Ark., Lieut.-Col. E. Jpbell; 14th Kan., Lieut.-Col. John G. Brown. cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Eugene A. Carr. First Brigade, Col. John F. Ritter: 3d Ark., Maj. George F. Lovejoy; 1st Mo., Capt. Miles Kehoe; 2d Mo., Capt. William H. Higdon; 13th Ill. and 3d Iowa (detachment), Capt. Adolph Bechaud. Third Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Joseph W. Caldwell: 1st J. Preston; 7th Mo.,----; 8th Mo., Col. W. L. Jeffers; 10th Mo., Col. R. R. Leather; Mo. Battery, Capt.----Harris. Shelby's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph O. Shelby: 1st Mo., Battalion, Maj. Benjamin Elliott; 5th Mo., Col. B. F. Gordon; 11th Mo., Col. M . W. Smith; 12th Mo., Col. David Shanks; Hunter's Reg't, Col. D. C. Hunter; Mo. Ba
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Land operations against Mobile. (search)
ent by the army and the fleet began at daylight. At 6 o'clock the next morning, the 23d, the white flag was shown, and the fort surrendered at 2:30 P. M. About five hundred prisoners were taken and about fifty guns. General Grant, in his official report, says: The total captures [at the three forts] amounted to 1464 prisoners and 104 pieces of artillery.--editors. After Thomas had overthrown Hood at Nashville (December 16th, 1864), Grant ordered him to follow Hood south, but when in January the badness of the roads stopped the movement at Eastport, Grant detached A. J. Smith with the reorganized Sixteenth Corps The original Sixteenth Corps, constituted December 18th, 1862, and first commanded by Major-General S. A. Hurlbut, was broken up November 7th, 1864. It was reorganized February 18th, 1865, under Major-General Andrew J. Smith.--editors. and sent him to join Canby at New Orleans. In anticipation of this, on the 18th of January, Grant ordered Canby to move against Mob
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
city before they discovered her character, too late to stop her progress. Twenty miles below the city she met the Richmond, and finding farther advance impossible Read ran her ashore and burnt her. On the 3d of June Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh received the surrender of Lieutenant J. H. Carter and the Confederate naval forces under his command in the Red River. On the west Gulf coast the blockade continued until the end, several important cutting-out expeditions occurring during January and February. Among these the most noteworthy were the capture of the Delphina, January 22d, in Calcasieu River, by Lieutenant-Commander R. W. Meade; of the Pet and the Anna Sophia, February 7th, at Galveston, by an expedition organized by Commander J. R. M. Mullany; and of the Anna Dale, February 18th, at Pass Cavallo, by a party sent in by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Erben. After the surrender of Mobile, Admiral Thatcher turned his attention to the coast of Texas, and on May 25th Sabine
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
river. Her cruise lasted six months, during which she made fifteen prizes. Of these seven were destroyed, one was ransomed, one recaptured, and the remaining six were sent into Cienfuegos, where they were released by the Cuban authorities. In January the Sumter arrived at Gibraltar, where she was laid up and finally sold. The Confederate Government early recognized that in order to attack the commerce of the United States with any hope of success it must procure cruisers abroad. For this She sailed with a cargo of cotton on December 24th, while the first attack on Fort Fisher was in progress. Captain John Wilkinson of the navy commanded her, and his object was to obtain supplies at Bermuda for Lee's army. She returned late in January, but was unable to enter either Wilmington or Charleston, and after landing her stores at Nassau she proceeded to Liverpool. Here she was seized by the authorities, and ultimately she was delivered to the United States. The last of the Confe
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