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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
etings, which were well attended, and all went off quietly. And still the South awaited the sign that the North— that Boston—would not put her off with empty words. The vagabond Thompson, as the Boston Transcript Lib. 5.131, 132. called him—the wandering insurrectionist—first began after the Faneuil Hall meeting to experience the deadly hostility invoked against him there. From his peaceful labors in the Old Colony and its vicinity, at Lib. 5.2. the close of 1834, he had passed in January to Andover, where he had the ear of the theological and academical students; to Concord, Mass.; to various parts of Essex County, where the meeting-houses of Methodists, Baptists, Unitarians and Friends were opened to him. In the intervals of these excursions he spoke frequently in Boston. In February, accompanied by the Rev. Amos A. Phelps and by Henry Benson, he visited southern New Hampshire and Portland, Maine, still enjoying the hospitality of the churches and promoting new antislave
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
n an emancipated race. This scene was shortly to be realized in the British West Indies. Mr. Garrison's family expenses and responsibilities were increased in January by the birth of a son, named Ms. Jan. 20, 1838, W. L. G. to Mrs. Sarah Benson. for himself, in Boston, while he was without a home of his own. Later, upon the de, and at last his right hand,—as if to preclude him utterly from continuing his editorial work. With Ms. Jan. 15, 1838, W. L. G. to G. W. Benson. difficulty in January could he complete his annual report to the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, and it was delivered piecemeal fresh from composition. The portion that dealt wiin Boston in a series of weekly lectures by prominent Unitarian clergymen at the Odeon—the redeemed Federal-Street Theatre. Henry Ware, Jr., began the course in January; Dr. Channing and Samuel Lib. 8.15, 27. J. May followed in February. In April, the New York Peace Society issued a call for a representative convention Lib. 8.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
Clair sought to exclude the female members, but Francis Jackson promptly ruled that it is in order for women to vote, and no appeal was heard. Before the political issue could be taken up, the Society adjourned informally, on the morning of January Lib. 9.14, 18, 19, 25. 24, to Faneuil Hall, which had been granted by the city authorities for a meeting of citizens in favor of abolition in the District of Columbia. By this unprecedented concession all minds were at once turned to the Union country by the U. S. Government (Lib. 10: 13).to Spain as Lib. 10.1. merchandise found with pirates. The first number of the Non-Resistant was issued amid the uproar caused by the explosion of Mr. Garrison's New-Organization counter-mine in January. It was a small folio of four columns to the page, these being the same in width as the Liberator's columns, to permit interchangeability of matter. The size of the printed page was about 10 1/2 by 16 1/2 inches. There was no pagination, whe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
hey not in vain to Heaven send up their cry; For all mankind from bondage shall be freed, And from the earth be chased all forms of tyranny. The retrospect from the beginning, on this thirty-fifth birthday, may well have astounded the still youthful founder of the anti-slavery movement. But passing from the romance of his own career to the events of the twelvemonth just closing, there was much to stimulate his ardor for the fray. The new gag applied by Lib. 10.6, 23, 31. Congress in January In the House, offered by Wm. Cost Johnson of Maryland, to wit: That no petition, memorial, resolution, or other paper, praying the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, or any State or Territory, or the slave trade between the States or Territories of the United States in which it now exists, shall be received by this House, or entertained in any way whatever. The vote was 114 yeas to 108 nays. The Senate followed suit (Lib. 10: 31). had stirred again in Massachusetts the s