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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
's tracts, and his Review for the first year,—in short all the publications that contain any thing of his philosophy,—to Rev. Professor Whewell, Athenaeum Club, London. The latter is a friend of mine, and is now engaged on an extensive philosophical work. In my last I wrote you that Prescott's book had been reviewed in the Edinburgh. The author is Mr. Gayangos, a Spaniard and great friend of Lord Holland. He also wrote the article on the Moors in the London and Foreign Quarterly, for January. My friend, Henry Reeve, Mr. Reeve, who was born in 1813, was at one time the editor of the Edinburgh Review, and has translated Tocqueville's Democracy in America. He has been for some years Registrar of the Privy Council. Sumner dined with him in 1839, at Chapel Street, Belgrave Square; and, in 1857, breakfasted with him in company with the French princes His recollections of Sumner are given, ante, Vol. I. p. 305. the editor of this Review during the absence of John Kemble (now in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
rning and pettifogging habits (I must use the phrase) which characterize so large a part of the lawyers of America. The omitted part of the letter is chiefly a strong plea for an interest in Crawford. . . .I shall be in Boston in December or January. Let me hear from you there at least, if not before; and believe me, as ever, Most sincerely yours, C. S. To George W. Greene, Rome. Florence, Sept. 11, 1839. dear Greene,—I have thought of you every hour since I left Rome; but have dnna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at the end of December or beginning of January. Venice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to t<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
nently fortunate you are destined to be. . . . You say you shall be at home in January; but I shall be agreeably disappointed if you arrive so soon. You will be mos to Cologne; then to Brussels, Antwerp, London,—where I shall be at the end of January,—thence to sail for America. If this letter reaches you by the British Queenyond price that of my friends. February 11. Left Berlin in the middle of January, cold as the North Pole, and passed to Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and three articles by Saint-Marc Girardin in the same paper during the month of January. Also an article in the Supplement du Constitutionnel at the end of December; also in the National during January; also in the Revue des deux Mondes, for January. I write entirely from memory, and do not know if these journals are procurableJanuary. I write entirely from memory, and do not know if these journals are procurable in Boston; but all these articles are interesting to Americans: they are well written, and come from distinguished pens. It was the first article about which I con
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, February 11. (search)
February 11. Left Berlin in the middle of January, cold as the North Pole, and passed to Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and Heidelberg; for a day and night was shut up in the carriage with four Jews, one a great Rabbi with a tremendous Journal des Debats about 15th November, and three articles by Saint-Marc Girardin in the same paper during the month of January. Also an article in the Supplement du Constitutionnel at the end of December; also in the National during January; alsoJanuary; also in the Revue des deux Mondes, for January. I write entirely from memory, and do not know if these journals are procurable in Boston; but all these articles are interesting to Americans: they are well written, and come from distinguished pens. It January. I write entirely from memory, and do not know if these journals are procurable in Boston; but all these articles are interesting to Americans: they are well written, and come from distinguished pens. It was the first article about which I conversed with Prince Metternich. Von Raumer's German translation, which, by the way, was made by Tieck's daughter, seems to have fallen still-born. Nobody says a word about it. He seems a little mortified to se
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
venerable father, a lawyer emeritus, who has the rare felicity of living to see the fame of his son. I am expecting your speech in honor of St. Nicholas. Which in the calendar shall you serve next? Ever most sincerely yours, Charles Sumner To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Dec. 10, 1841:— Lord Morpeth has just returned to Boston, after a pleasant trip to Niagara, and a visit of a fortnight to New York. He will be here a fortnight; then to Philadelphia; then to Baltimore, and at the end of January or the beginning of February will be in Washington; afterwards, to the South and West. I must close now, in great haste. Business calls. I charged one client yesterday, as part of my fee in a case, six hundred dollars. He had the grace to say that it was no more than he expected, and not so much as I deserved. I do not think my sister Mary This is his earliest reference, in his letters, to his sister's ill-health. is well, or in good spirits. A letter from you would have heal
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
tional law, his only published article, during the year 1842, was a review of Professor Greenleaf's treatise on the Law of Evidence, then first issued. American Jurist, July, 1842, Vol. XXVII. pp. 379-408. In the early part of the year he taught in the Law School as Judge Story's substitute. His social life varied this year little from what it had been during the two preceding. In the spring he visited New York with Prescott,—their special errand being to meet Washington Irving. In January he had many pleasant interviews with Dickens, who brought a letter to him from John Kenyon, and who was grateful for his kindness. Dickens's Life, Vol. I. p. 305. Late in August he met Lord Ashburton, who was then in Boston, and visited with him places of interest in the city and suburbs. With Lord Morpeth, who was journeying in various parts of the country, he continued his correspondence. Morpeth sailed on his return Sept. 29. Sumner passed the last five days in New York with him,—
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
The Boston Post also contained a long article from a correspondent in reply to the oration. August 21. Paixhan. It may be mentioned, too, that the next city orator, Fletcher Webster, expressed sentiments the reverse of those which his predecessor had inculcated. A few copies of the oration reached England about the first of December. One of them fell into the hands of Mr. Richard Rathbone, of Liverpool, at whose instance the Peace Society of that city published, late in the following January, an abridgment prepared by him. Seven thousand copies of this edition were printed; of which this Society distributed two thousand, the London Peace Society two thousand, and other Peace Societies the remaining three thousand. The friends of Peace took special pains to send copies to daily and weekly journals, reviews, and other periodicals, and to eminent clergymen and public men,—among whom were the Duke of Wellington, Sir Robert Peel, the Earl of Aberdeen, Lord Palmerston, and Lord Joh