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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for January or search for January in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
le you are closing up your business here. The steamer Ida and appurtenances have also been taken possession of under the same authority. This, I believe, includes all the property held by you in the State of Georgia, as military engineer of the United States, but does not include any lighthouse property. You have already been notified, informally, that Forts Pulaski and Jackson had been occupied by the troops of the State of Georgia under my command. Another famous incident of this first month of 1861 was the seizure at New York, probably on the orders of the governor of that State, of thirty-eight boxes of muskets, purchased by the firm of D. C. Hodgkins & Sons, Macon, for shipment by the steamer Monticello to Savannah. After a sharp remonstrance, which was unheeded, Governor Brown directed Colonel Lawton to order out sufficient military force and seize and hold, subject to his order, every ship then in the harbor of Savannah, belonging to citizens of New York. When the pro
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
nce from the Resolute in returning. The Fingal found every channel of escape shut off, and a pilot sent to reconnoiter a passage by way of the Romney marsh, himself narrowly evaded capture. The Federal authorities were undoubtedly fully aware of the presence of the daring cruiser and her anxiety to get out. To add to the difficulties of exit, a number of hulks loaded with stone were sunk by the enemy in the channel of the river below Fort Pulaski, as well as in other channels, and late in January Captain Bulloch reported that there was no prospect of taking the ship out. He then turned her over to Lieut. G. T. Sinclair and returned to Europe by way of Wilmington. Gen. Henry R. Jackson, whose gallant career in Virginia will be hereafter described, was appointed major-general of State forces by Governor Brown, and assumed command December 28, 1861, with headquarters at Savannah. General Jackson advised General Lee that he held himself subject to the latter's directions in all mili
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
large number of families and valuable property at the ridge until reinforcements could arrive. The woods surrounding Darien were shelled during the burning of the town. The enemy consisted of negroes under white officers. They captured a pilot boat with sixty bales of cotton on board, and carried off some negroes, most of them free. In addition to the land defenses and the floating battery Georgia, the ironclad Atlanta was still on duty in the Savannah river and adjacent passages. In January, Commodore Tattnall had proposed to attack the blockaders with the Atlanta, but on going down with the first high spring tide found that the engineer officers were unable to remove the obstructions for his passage. When the next high tide arrived he was stationed by General Mercer off Carston's bluff on account of the attacks on Fort McAllister. The government becoming impatient, the gallant old commodore was relieved, and Lieut. William A. Webb was ordered to take command of the Atlanta,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
the people for the purpose of an expression of opinion as to whether the war should be continued. In the latter part of January, the main body of Sherman's army crossed into South Carolina. The return of Confederate forces in South Carolina, Janarrest and send forward deserters and stragglers. Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill was put in command of the district of Georgia in January. General Iverson was put in command of a cavalry division including the brigades of Hannon and Lewis, about ,500 men. Troops began reaching Augusta from Hood's army late in January, and D. H. Hill was ordered to take command of them. In January, Major-General Hoke's division, including Colquitt's Georgia brigade, was sent from Richmond to assist in the defense of January, Major-General Hoke's division, including Colquitt's Georgia brigade, was sent from Richmond to assist in the defense of Fort Fisher, below Wilmington, N. C., where they came under the command of General Bragg. Unfortunately, they were not permitted to take part in the gallant defense of that stronghold. General Colquitt was sent with his staff in a small row-boat t
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
mutterings of the coming storm could then be plainly heard. He regretted sincerely the rupture between the North and South, as did all those who had ever served in the army of the United States. But he did not hesitate as to his duty or his inclination, and threw his whole soul into the tender of service which he made to the Confederate government. At first he served his own State as major-general of the First division of Georgia volunteers, being appointed by the State, April 25, 1861. One month from that time he accepted the commission of brigadier-general in the army of the Confederate States. He served at Pensacola during a part of 1861. He was not of great physical strength, and his arduous military services had told on him, so that for more than a year from October, 1861, he was out of the conflict, but on the 5th of February, 1863, he re-entered the army as brigadier-general, and was placed in command at Savannah. On May 23d he was promoted to major-general and sent to c