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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 29 29 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for January 1st or search for January 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 15 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
retaliatory measures to be taken because of the course of General Butler in New Orleans, and dooming him and his officers to death by hanging when caught. He ordered that no commanding officer should be released or paroled before exchanged until General Butler should be punished.—24. Heavy skirmish at Dumfries, Va., when the Confederates were repulsed.—27. A company of Union cavalry were surprised and captured at Occoquan, Va.—31. the Monitor sunk at sea south of Cape Hatteras. 1863.—Jan. 1. General Sullivan fought Forrest near Lexington, Tenn. Emancipation jubilee of the negroes at Hilton Head, S. C.—2. Gold at New York, 133 1/4 @ 133 7/8.—3. Department of the East created, and General Wool assigned to its command.—4. Confederates defeated at Moorefield, W. Va. The Confederate General Magruder declares the port of Galveston, Tex., opened to the commerce of the world. Clarkesville, Tenn., surrenders to the Union forces.—5. An indignation meeting of the opposition
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellet, Charles, 1810- (search)
Ellet, Charles, 1810- Engineer; born in Penn's Manor, Bucks co., Pa., Jan. 1, Charles Ellet. 1810; planned and built the first wire suspension bridge in the United States, across the Schuylkill at Fairmount; and planned and constructed the first suspension bridge over the Niagara River below the Falls, and other notable bridges. When the Civil War broke out he turned his attention to the construction of steam rams for the Western Ellet's stern-wheel ram. rivers, and a plan proposed by him to the Secretary of War (Mr. Stanton) was adopted, and he soon converted ten or twelve powerful steamers on the Mississippi into rams, with which he rendered great assistance in the capture of Memphis. In the battle there he was struck by a musket-ball in the knee, from the effects of which he died, in Cairo, Ill., June 21, 1862. Mr. Ellet proposed to General McClellan a plan for cutting off the Confederate army at Manassas, which the latter rejected, and the engineer wrote and published
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emancipation proclamations. (search)
vernments existing there, will be continued. That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtor their actual freedom. That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts o among other things, the following to wit: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtfor their actual freedom. That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts osary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixt Fac-simile of the emancipation proclamation That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtbe affixed. [L. S.] Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holidays, legal. (search)
Monday in September, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25. Florida. Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, Arbor Day, April 26, June 3, July 4, firsr, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Georgia. Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, April 26, June 3, July 4, first Monday iner, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Kansas. Jan. 1, Arbor Day, May 30, public fast, July 4, first Monday in S Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Louisiana. Jan. 1 and 8, Feb. 22, Mardi-Gras in New Orleans, Good-Friday, Ap election, every Saturday afternoon. North Carolina. Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, May 10 and 20, July 4, Labor Day, Thanksg5, State election, general election. South Carolina. Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, May 10, July 4, first Monday in September Thanksgiving, Dec. 25, general election. Tennessee. Jan. 1, Good-Friday, second Friday in May, May 30, July 4, first 0, July 4, Aug. 16, Thanksgiving, Dec. 25. Virginia. Jan. 1 and 19, Feb. 22, Fast Day, June 3, July 4, first Monday
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monroe, James 1759-1870 (search)
the government of France against the officer by whom it was committed. The actual condition of the public finances more than realizes the favorable anticipations that were entertained of it at the opening of the last session of Congress. On Jan. 1 there was a balance in the treasury of $4,237,427.55. From that time to Sept. 30 the receipts amounted to upward of $16,100,000, and the expenditures to $11,400,000. During the fourth quarter of the year it is estimated that the receipts will at least equal the expenditures, and that there will remain in the treasury on Jan. 1 next a surplus of nearly $9,000,000. On Jan. 1, 1825, a large amount of the war debt and a part of the Revolutionary debt will become redeemable. Additional portions of the former will continue to become redeemable annually until the year 1835. It is believed, however, that, if the United States remain at peace, the whole of that debt may be redeemed by the ordinary revenue of those years, during that period,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mormons, (search)
or unlawful cohabitation before the passage of this act, on such conditions and under such limitations as he shall think proper; but no such amnesty shall have effect unless the conditions thereof shall be complied with; that the issue of bigamous or polygamous marriages, known as Mormon marriages, in cases in which such marriages have been solemnized accordingly to the ceremonies of the Mormon sect in any Territory of the United States, and such issue shall have been born before the first day of January, anno Domini eighteen hundred and eighty-three; are hereby legitimated; and that no polygamist, bigamist, or any person cohabiting with more than one woman, and no woman cohabiting with any of those persons described as aforesaid in this section in any such Territory or other place over which the United States has exclusive jurisdiction, shall be entitled to vote at any election held in any such Territory or place, or be eligible for election or appointment to, or be entitled to hold
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battle of Murfreesboro, or battle of Stone River, (search)
multaneously and drove the Confederates rapidly before them. This charge decided the question of victory. In twenty minutes the Confederates had lost 2,000 men. At sunset their entire line had fallen back, leaving 400 men captives. Darkness was coming on, and the Nationals did not pursue. It rained heavily the next day, and preparations were made for another attack; but at midnight (Jan. 4) Bragg and his army retreated in the direction of Chattanooga. He had telegraphed to Richmond, Jan. 1, God has granted us a happy New year. The Nationals in the fight numbered 43,400; the Confederates, 62,720. The Nationals lost 12,000 men, of whom 1,538 were killed. Bragg reported his loss at 10,000. It was estimated by Rosecrans to be much greater than his own. On the spot where Hazen's thin brigade so gallantly held the Confederates at bay, a lasting memorial of the event has been erected in the form of a substantial stone monument in the centre of a lot surrounded by a heavy wall of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Orleans. (search)
in 600 yards of the American breastworks, right, centre, and left. Upon these they had mounted thirty pieces of heavy ordnance, manned by picked VillereaS mansion. gunners from the fleet. The works were hidden by a thick fog on the morning of Jan. 1 (1815). When it lifted, the British opened a brisk fire, not doubting that in a few minutes the contemptible defences of the Americans would be scattered to the winds. The army was arrayed in battle order to rush forward and capture the works ann the levee were demolished, and the invaders ran helter-skelter to the ditch for protection. Under cover of the ensuing night, they crawled back to their camp, dragging with them a part of their cannon over the oozy ground. It was a bitter New Year's Day for the British army. They had been without food or sleep for sixty hours. There was joy in the American camp. It was increased when Gen. John Adair announced that more than 2,000 drafted men from Kentucky, under Maj.-Gen. John Thomas, were
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
can 1894 David B. HillDemocrat. Everett P. WheelerDemocrat. F. E . BaldwinProhibition. Charles B. MatthewsSocialist. Frank S. BlackRepublican1896Wilbur F. PorterDemocrat. Daniel G. GriffinNat. Dem. William W. SmithProhibition. Theodore RooseveltRepublican1898 Augustus Van WyckDemocrat. Henry McDonaldSilver Dem. Benj. B. Odell, JrRepublican1900John B. StanchfieldDemocrat. The first governors of the State entered office on July 1 following election, but since 1823 the date has been Jan. 1. The term of office was, up to 1823, three years; then until 1876, two years; from 1876 until 1895, three years; from 1895, two years. The governor and lieutenant-governor must be thirty years of age, a citizen of the United States, and five years a resident of the State. United States Senators. Name. No. of Congress.Term. Philip Schuyler1st1789 to 1791 Rufus King1st to 4th1789 to 1796 Aaron Burr2d to 5th1791 to 1797 John Lawrence4th to 6th1796 to 1800 Philip Schuyler5th 1797 to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Non-importation acts. (search)
, and any measure which might interrupt its course would be felt by a large and powerful class in England, whose influence would in turn be felt in Parliament. Few dared to think of positive rebellion. A bright thought occurred to some one at a meeting of merchants in New York on Oct. 31, 1765, the day before the Stamp Act was to go into operation. It was proposed at that meeting that the merchants should enter into an agreement not to import from England certain enumerated articles after Jan. 1 next ensuing. At another meeting (Nov. 6) a committee of correspondence was appointed, who soon set the ball in motion. The merchants of Philadelphia readily responded to the measure, and on Dec. 9 those of Boston entered into a similar agreement. These pledges were not confined to the merchants alone, but the people in general ceased using foreign luxuries; and at the same time, as a part of the same plan, a combination was entered into for the support of American manufactures, the weari
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