Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for January 1st or search for January 1st in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
o voted, that there be a general meeting of the citizens of the town held every Tuesday evening until the 5th of January next, to commence on Tuesday evening next at six o'clock, to encourage recruiting, and to consider measures by which to fill the quota of the town. 1864. On the 3d of February the town voted to pay four dollars a month to each person dependent on a volunteer for support, provided the amount to any one family shall not exceed eighteen dollars a month. 1865. On the 1st of January a large meeting of citizens was held, at which, after discussion, it was voted to raise by voluntary subscription a sufficient sum from which to pay to each volunteer who will enlist in the service of the United States, and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars; and a paper having been prepared, thirty-two hundred and five dollars were subscribed by those present at the meeting, which fully sufficed to fill the quota; and at a legal town-me
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e recent calls of the President for more men. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by taxation, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President dated July 18, 1864. 1835. June 17th, Voted, to refund all money contributed by individuals during 1864, in aid of recruiting men to fill the quota of the town, provided the claim shall be presented in writing to the selectmen before the first day of January next; and persons who have served one year in the military service shall not be taxed to pay any part of said amounts. The selectmen of Easton reported in 1866 that the town had furnished three hundred and thirty-four men for the war, Forty-six of whom died in the service. which is more than the number that was required of it. The surplus of men at the end of the war, after the town had filled its quota upon every call made by the President, was thirty-four. Fourteen were commi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
men were authorized to draw warrants upon the treasurer in favor of the Executive Committee to pay the same. 1862. July 26th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of twelve volunteers who shall enlist for three years and be mustered in to fill the quota of the town. August 3d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each nine-months volunteer to fill the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay these bounties. 1863. January 1st, The selectmen were authorized to fill the quota called for under the last call of the President, and to pay such bounties as might be necessary to procure the men. 1864. June 8th, Voted, that a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid to all volunteers who shall enlist and be credited to the town during the year. Enfield furnished about one hundred and seven men for the war, which was a surplus of nine over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. The w