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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 29 29 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 24 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for January 1st or search for January 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
aptured, to be treated as prisoners of war. Later on, in the fall of that year, came the barbarous orders and conduct of Generals Milroy, Butler and Hunter, which led to the proclamations of outlawry against these officers, and directing that they and their commissioned officers should not be treated, if captured, as prisoners of war, and, therefore, should not be exchanged, but kept in confinement. In September, 1862, Mr. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation was issued, to take effect January 1st following, which caused Mr. Davis to issue another proclamation on December 23rd, 1862, directing that any Federal officer who should be arrested whilst either enrolling, or in command of negroes, who were slaves, should be turned over to the authorities of the several States in which the offenses were committed, and punished for the crime of inciting servile insurrection. These several proclamations of Mr. Davis created considerable uneasiness among the Federal authorities, and furnishe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
all were preparing for the more active duties of the field, which they felt in view. The professors, however, in the meantime, anxious to preserve the life of the College, spared no efforts to insure their return upon the opening of the College in January. The quiet which ensued the fall of Port Royal afforded the Governor a good pretext, and so on the 10th day of December the company was mustered out of service and the students ordered to prepare themselves to return to College on the 1st of January. The students, however, felt that the time had come when duty required that they should be at the front, and so, fired by their patriotic zeal, most of them at once joined other commands and became regularly enlisted in the army. The action of the Governor at this time in disbanding the company defeated the hopes which the students had entertained of going to the front in a body. In fact, the faculty of the College, as well as State officials, deemed it inexpedient that they should