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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
e, strengthened by reinforcements from below Jackson, had resumed their stations at Trenton and Humboldt, and were preparing to cut off Forrest's retreat. On the 31st the main body of the raiders was intercepted at Parker's Cross Roads, on the road to Lexington, by a brigade under Colonel C. L. Dunham, subsequently joined by Colonel J. W. Fuller's brigade, and after a desperate engagement Forrest retired toward the Tennessee. Forrest's estimate of his force in this battle is 1800 men. On January 2d, the whole command recrossed the Tennessee at Clifton.-editors. and on the 23d of December he ordered Sherman to delay his expedition. But Sherman was already on the way to Vicksburg, whence, after making an ineffectual attempt to capture the place [see p. 462], he reimbarked his army and retired to Milliken's Bend. McClernand arrived at Milliken's Bend on the 3d of January, 1863, and the next day assumed command of the expedition. Having nothing better to do, he determined to capture
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
ision and brigade commanders, namely, Wheeler, Cleburne, and Withers, Patton Anderson, J. C. Brown, J. K. Jackson, Bate, and Walthall. The certainty he felt that General Rosecrans would retire from his front had led him to suffer the 1st to pass without advancing his right to cover the rising ground, thus giving ample leisure to Rosecrans to intrench and to restore order to his army after the fight of the 31st, when all the advantages of battle had remained with us. But on Friday, the 2d of January, he was convinced that Rosecrans was not going to retreat and that fighting must soon be resumed. After riding over the ground early on the morning of the 2d, at 11 o'clock he had adopted the following plan: To seize and carry by a vigorous assault that rising ground now occupied by the Federal forces, allowing only one hour to intervene between the time of the attack and dark, so that night should stop the fighting and give us opportunity to fortify at once. It was for that reason the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
. Artillery, Capt. Cyrus O. Loomis: A, Ky. (3d Brigade), Capt. David C. Stone; A, 1st Mich. (2d Brigade), Lieut. George W. Van Pelt; H, 5th U. S. (4th Brigade), Lieut. Francis L. Guenther. Artillery loss embraced in brigades to which attached. Cavalry: 2d Ky. (6 co's), Maj. Thomas P. Nicholas. Loss: w, 3. Second (late eighth) division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Negley. First (late Twenty-fifth) Brigade, The 14th Mich., 85th Ill., and two sections 10th Wis. Battery temporarily attached Jan. 2d and 3d. Brig.-Gen. James G. Spears: 1st Tenn., Col. Robert K. Byrd; 2d Tenn., Lieut.-Col. James M. Melton; 6th Tenn., Col. Joseph A. Cooper. Brigade loss: k, 5; w, 28 = 33. Second (late Twenty-ninth) Brigade, Col. Timothy R. Stanley: 19th Ill., Col. Joseph R. Scott (w), Lieut.-Col. Alexander W. Raffen; 11th Mich., Col. William L. Stoughton; 18th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Josiah Given; 69th Ohio, Col. William B. Cassilly (w), Maj. Eli J. Hickcox, Capt. David Putman, Capt. Joseph H. Brigham, Lieut.-
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Stone's River. (search)
nearly in sight. In his front and right, an elevation still held by Hanson's brigade of Breckinridge's division was crowned by Cobb's battery of artillery. On the left and rear, Grose's brigade of Palmer's division occupied a knoll in support of Livingston's battery on the following day. The Confederate line, formed by Polk and Breckinridge on the right and Hardee on the left, extended from the point on Stone's River where Position of Starkweather's and Scribner's brigades on January 1, 2, and 3. from a Lithograph. Chalmers's brigade had bivouacked since the 25th, in a direction almost at right angles with its original line. At dawn on the 1st of January the right flank of General Polk was advanced to occupy the ground vacated by the Union army on the west bank of the river. Neither-commander deemed it advisable to attack, but each was watchful of every movement of the other. The picket lines on either side were thrust forward within sight of the main lines of the op
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Union left at Stone's River. (search)
rm to our movements on the right, but that line was maintained by stubborn fighting. Thomas was then not far back, and that helped me more. (McCook was too far away for any protection to my flank.) Rousseau's men were driven out of the woods, a regular dense thicket, and Shepherd's regu lars suffered fearfully in there. They moved in by the head of column. There was no fighting of consequence on the 1st of January. The last attack made by the enemy was upon my extreme left, on the 2d of January, and it was disastrous to them. Van Cleve's division, under Colonel Samuel Beatty, had crossed the river on the 1st, and Grose and Hazen had followed with their brigades on the 2d. The fight opened on Colonel Beatty's line and lasted about twenty minutes. Before this battle I had been inclined to underrate the importance of artillery in our war, but I never knew that arm to render such important service as at this point. The sound judgment, bravery, and skill of Major John Mendenhall,