Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for January 3rd or search for January 3rd in all documents.

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eek at George's Creek, he passed on to Paintsville. He was reinforced by Bolles's West Virginia Cavalry, 300 men, and by 300 men of the Twenty-second Kentucky Regiment. While this column was moving up the Big Sandy, another, consisting of the Fortieth Ohio Regiment and three battalions of Wolford's cavalry, advanced from Mount Sterling to take Marshall in the rear. To avoid this danger, Marshall fell back some fifteen miles, and took position on Middle Creek, near Prestonburg. On the 3d of January the Confederates captured a sergeant and three men of McLaughlin's cavalry, with their horses, in front of Paintsville. On January 7th Bolles's cavalry engaged the Confederate cavalry-pickets, with a loss of two or three on each side. On the 9th of January Garfield advanced against Marshall's position at Prestonburg, and on the next day attacked him. The engagement was not a serious one. Garfield reported that he fought all day, engaging only about 900 of his own men, inflicting a
ar. General H. V. Boynton, in his volume entitled Sherman's historical raid (Chapter II.), denies the justice of this claim. He gives the credit to General Grant; but also shows, from the correspondence of Buell and Halleck, that, on the 3d of January, Buell proposed a combined attack on the centre and flanks of Johnston's lines. Buell estimated the Confederate force at double its actual strength, and concluded his note, The attack upon the centre should be made by two gunboat expeditionsnts being laid off ready to commence work as soon as the shelters were made. When the engineer, Captain Hayden, was urged to his work, the answer was that General Tilghman had not passed on the plan. A courier was sent to General Tilghman on the 3d or 4th of January, advising him that laborers were then in transitu from North Alabama. The general came to Fort Henry on the 15th-and then it was, when I left, debated whether it was not too late to throw up works on the west side, as contemplate
enry. Badeau says, This was the first mention of Fort Donelson, whether in conversation or dispatches, between the two commanders. This statement is erroneous. Halleck telegraphed Buell, January 31st: I have ordered an advance on Fort Henry and _Dover. It will be made immediately. He frequently calls Fort Donelson Dover. He also says, February 2d, It is only proposed to take and occupy Fort Henry and Dover, etc. Buell, however, had recommended the same movement to Halleck, as early as January 3d, and had already voluntarily started thirteen regiments to aid Grant in it. Halleck was also sending reinforcements, and he replied to Grant on the 8th: Some of the gunboats from Fort Holt will be sent up. Reinforcements will reach you daily. Hold on to Fort Henry at all hazards. Impress slaves, if necessary, to strengthen your position as rapidly as possible. On the 10th he again promised large reinforcements. Grant was not able to make good his promise. His biographer attr