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Twenty-second Kentucky Regiment. While this column was moving up the Big Sandy, another, consisting of the Fortieth Ohio Regiment and three battalions of Wolford's cavalry, advanced from Mount Sterling to take Marshall in the rear. To avoid this danger, Marshall fell back some fifteen miles, and took position on Middle Creek, near Prestonburg. On the 3d of January the Confederates captured a sergeant and three men of McLaughlin's cavalry, with their horses, in front of Paintsville. On January 7th Bolles's cavalry engaged the Confederate cavalry-pickets, with a loss of two or three on each side. On the 9th of January Garfield advanced against Marshall's position at Prestonburg, and on the next day attacked him. The engagement was not a serious one. Garfield reported that he fought all day, engaging only about 900 of his own men, inflicting a heavy loss on the Confederates, and losing only one man killed and twenty wounded. Garfield's report claimed a victory. He says: A
follow General Johnston's instructions of December 10th, and harass or attack them. These expeditions, undertaken in the depth of winter, improved the morale of the Federal troops, and accustomed them to the hardships of a winter campaign. In this demonstration, C. F. Smith moved his column in concert with the gunboats, returning by the left bank of the Tennessee to Paducah. Lieutenant Phelps, of the Conestoga, after a reconnaissance as far as the Tennessee State line, made on the 7th of January, reported the water barely sufficient to float this boat, drawing five feet five inches. He says, Fort Henry I have examined, and the work is formidable. Again, on the 16th, he proceeded up the river, accompanied by the transport-steamer Wilson, having on board a force of 500-infantry and artillery — under Major Ellston, and anchored for the night near where the Tennessee line strikes the right bank of the river. The next day they proceeded up the river, shelling the banks, and fired