Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for January 9th or search for January 9th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
poses. 1864. April 14th, Voted, to appropriate seventeen hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to fourteen men. April 12th, Voted, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties to twelve men; voted, to assess the sum of two thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars to refund the voluntary tax, and for recruiting purposes. Several other meetings were held during the year, at which money was appropriated, and means taken to obtain volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 1865. January 9th, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties to twelve volunteers. Somerset was reported by the selectmen in 1866 as having furnished one hundred and ninety-seven men for the war, which may have been a little in excess of the credits which the town received; but Somerset filled its quota upon every call of the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of fourteen over and above all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
a substitute for that term of service, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, the same to be paid when the man is mustered in and credited to the quota of the city. The finance committee was authorized to borrow thirty-seven thousand five hundred dollars to pay the same. December 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, eighty dollars for two years, and forty dollars for one year's service. 1865. January 9th, Messrs. Kent, Wilson, and Gilman, of the aldermen, Messrs. Smith (of Ward 1), Lawrence, Dunton, Hatch, Stover, and Daniels of the common council, were appointed a committee to have the charge and superintendence of recruiting volunteers, and determine the amount of bounty to be paid, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars to any one person; and the treasurer, under the direction of the finance committee, was authorized to borrow money to pay said bounties. The recruiting comm
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
d each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the city. July 21st, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five hundred thousand dollars additional for the payment of bounties to volunteers and recruiting purposes. 1865. January 2d, The aldermen and two members of the common council from each ward were appointed to act through the year as The Soldiers-Relief Committee, to determine and pay the allowance of State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law. January 9th, Aldermen Clapp, Tyler, and Dana, and Messrs. Warren, McLean, Darrow, Park, and Braman of the council, were appointed a committee to have charge of all matters relating to recruiting for the land and naval forces of the United States during the current year, the payment of bounties, and the revision of the enrollment lists in the several wards under the supervision of his honor the mayor. A joint committee was also appointed to provide suitably for returning regiments passing through Bos