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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, X. January, 1862 (search)
11 We have three candidates in the field in this district for Congress: President Tyler, James Lyons, and Wm. II. McFarland. The first will, of course, walk over the track. January 12 Gen. Wise, whose headquarters are to be fixed at Nag's Head on the beach near Roanoke Island, reports that the force he commands is altogether inadequate to defend the position. Burnside is said to have 20,000 men, besides a numerous fleet of gun-boats; and Gen. Wise has but 3000 effective men. January 13 The department leaves Gen. Wise to his superior officer, Gen. Huger, at Norfolk, who has 15,000 men. But I understand that Huger says Wise has ample means for the defense of the island, and refuses to let him have more men. This looks like a man-trap of the Red-tapers to get rid of a popular leader. I hope the President will interfere. January 14 All calm and quiet to-day. January 15 I forgot to mention the fact that some weeks ago I received a work in manuscript from Lond
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
fight again near the same place, and his men are in high spirits. Our men fight to kill now, since the emancipation doom has been pronounced. But we have had a hard rain and nightly frosts, which will put an end to campaigning during the remainder of the winter. The fighting will be on the water, or near it. The legislature is in session, and resolutions inimical to the passport system have already been introduced. But where are State Rights now? Congress meets to-morrow. January 13 The generals in North Carolina are importunate for reinforcements. They represent the enemy as in great force, and that Weldon, Goldsborough, Raleigh, and Wilmington are in extreme peril. Lee cannot send any, or, if he does, Richmond will be threatened again, and possibly taken. How shall we live? Boarding ranges from $60 to $100 per month. Our landlord says he will try to get boarding in the country, and if he succeeds, probably we may keep the house we now occupy, furnished, a
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 35 (search)
on writes in opposition to the organization of more cavalry. Mr. J. E. Murral, Mobile, Ala., writes Judge Campbell that a party there has authority from the United States authorities to trade anything but arms and ammunition for cotton. Gen. Winder being directed to send Mr. Hirsh, a rich Jew, to the conscript camp, says he gave him a passport to leave the Confederate States some days ago, on the order of Judge Campbell, A. S. W. Col. Northrop says supplies of meat have failed. January 13 There was firing yesterday near Georgetown, S. C., the nature and result of which is not yet known. Yesterday the Senate passed a bill allowing increased pay to civil officers in the departments; but Senator Brown, of Miss., proposed a proviso, which was adopted, allowing the increased compensation only to those who are not liable to perform military duty, and unable to bear arms. The auctions are crowded — the people seeming anxious to get rid of their money by paying the most
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 47 (search)
oads, etc. The Secretary is sending orders to different commanders, and says he would rather have the odium than that it should fall on Lee! The Commissary General approves Lee's measure. Gen. Lee's dispatch was dated last night. He says he has not two days rations for his army! Commissary-General Northrop writes to the Secretary that the hour of emergency is upon us, and that Gen. Lee's name may save the cause, if he proclaims the necessity of indiscriminate impressment, etc. January 13 Clear and pleasant-but little frost. Beef (what little there is in market) sells to-day at $6 per pound; meal, $80 per bushel; white beans, $5 per quart, or $160 per bushel. And yet Congress is fiddling over stupid abstractions! The government will awake speedily, however; and after Congress hurries through its business (when roused), the adjournment of that body will speedily ensue. But will the President dismiss his cabinet in time to save Richmond, Virginia, and the cause? Th