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red that it was addressed to a most intimate and trustworthy friend, not in Texas. It is given to show the drift of General Johnston's opinions at that time. A little later, if he had chosen to give expression to them, they would have been more emphatic in tone. On the 20th of January the Secretary of War, Barnard E. Bee, remarks in a friendly letter, that it would be useless to get men together without supplies; and adds, The nakedness of the land you will be struck with. On the 27th of January he informs General Johnston that the President is opposed to his making his headquarters beyond San Antonio. On February 26th H. McLeod writes very emphatically, The President will not change the frontier line, or reinforce General Johnston with militia. On the same day the Secretary of War writes, As we have not a dollar in the Treasury, we must be content to fold our arms; and again, on another occasion, he says: The Treasury is drained. Not a dollar is to be had. As the winter
organized, could not be expected to prove very efficient laborers. The demonstrations from Cairo and Paducah, and the simulated attack on Fort Henry, January 17th, made it clear that this position was liable to attack at any moment. General Johnston telegraphed, January 19th, to the Secretary of War, an accurate account of the enemy's movements and strength. He adds: I desire the Government, if it be possible, to send a strong force to Nashville, and another to Memphis. On January 27th General Johnston wrote Polk, Tilghman's immediate commander: Urge upon General Tilghman the necessity of immediate attention to the discipline and instruction of his command. A grave disaster has just befallen our arms at Mill Springs on our right, by neglect of this essential. Next day he wrote Tilghman: As you have now a large number of raw troops on hand, push forward their instruction as earnestly as possible. He also authorized him to employ special instructors, a