Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for January 29th or search for January 29th in all documents.

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five miles to Ball's Bridge on Indian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. Twenty-fifth, moved back the Jonesville road to Wyman's Mill. Twenty-sixth, moved back near Cumberland Gap. Twenty-seventh, moved back near Ball's Bridge. Remained here until the morning of the twenty-ninth, during which time our regiment turned its horses over to the Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry. January twenty-ninth, at daylight, the enemy attacked our pickets. Our brigade fell back to within a mile of the Gap. The rebels skirmished with us back to Wyman's Mill. Remained here until the thirty-first. Late on the evening of the thirty-first we moved out to the forks of the Jonesville and Mulberry Gap roads. Here we remained, having an occasional skirmish, until February eighth. On the evening of February eighth we crossed through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. February ninth, crossed Cumberl
Doc. 52.-General Vance's expedition. Richmond Examiner account. Richmond, Jan. 29. we have some interesting particulars of the recent expedition of the North-Carolina forces into East-Tennessee, which terminated so disastrously, and resulted, among other misfortunes, in the capture of General Vance, who was in command. General Vance crossed the Smoky Mountain at the head of Lufty, with about three hundred and fifty-five cavalry, two pieces of artillery, and one hundred and fifty Indians. The force had great difficulty in crossing; the soldiers had to take the horses out of the wagons to get down the mountain over a perfect sheet of ice for three miles. After getting to the foot, part of the command was left, while General Vance, with about one hundred and seventy-five men, started to Sevierville on a reconnoissance. When in about two miles, he heard of a Yankee train of wagons being there. Our small force immediately charged and captured seventeen wagons, one hundr
nd Ohio Railroad. To meet a movement of this kind, General Kelly made all possible preparation. Yet as time wore away, and the weather continued fair, and the enemy gave no signs of an intention to advance, a large number of men (including nearly the whole of a regiment of cavalry) who had reenlisted for the war were furloughed and allowed to go home, in accordance with the War Department order on that subject. Hardly had this been done when we got news of Early having moved on Friday, January twenty-ninth. Of course it was too late and a matter of impossibility to recall the furloughed troops. At the earliest possible moment cavalry, in small detachments, was sent out from Harper's Ferry, Martinsburgh, and Cumberland to gain information of the enemy's whereabouts. The scouting-parties did not bring us in any particularly reliable information, and hence many were inclined to believe the grand movement to be nothing more than Rosser's or Gillmore's forces out on a big foraging e