Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for January 30th or search for January 30th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
ously to abide by the decision of two thirds of those acting in it,—this being the favorite rule of Democratic national conventions; and in this vote Caleb Cushing, a member of the House, concurred. A vote by yeas and nays on written ballots resulted in fifty-eight for Sumner and twenty-seven against him; and his nomination was then ratified, with only five dissenting votes, The detailed account of the proceedings will be found in Wilson's two statements, published in the Commonwealth, January 30 and February 18, the Commonwealth's article of February 10, and a Democratic narrative, prepared by James S. Whitney of Conway, or Whiting Griswold of Greenfield, both of whom voted for Sumner. and with no signs of persevering opposition from any quarter. His election now seemed assured. George S. Boutwell, Democrat, was chosen governor, and the other State offices were filled as had been arranged. At this point, however, some Democratic members, led by Cushing, met in caucus and decid
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
ustom himself to his new forum, and to show that general affairs were within his purpose and grasp, before entering on the discussion of the slavery question. It was curious to see how eagerly the Whig journals of Boston seized upon the speech as a means for weakening the senator's position. They withheld it from their readers, though publishing Underwood's reply; and they imputed to its author an extravagance of generosity to the new States at the expense of the old. The Advertiser January 30; February 2, 3, 7; April 16. teemed with a series of editorial criticisms exceeding in length the speech itself; and its contemporaries Atlas, April 16 and 17. The Courier, Traveller, and Journal dissented from the senator, but the Transcript (February 2 and 13) and the Commonwealth (February 4 and April 5) justified him. in that city, with less elaboration, joined in the censure. The spirit of these critics was shown in the fact that they did not quarrel with the result to which he cam
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
r. Jay belongs the credit of starting the earliest protest in New York,—the public meeting held in Broadway Tabernacle, January 30. The other Northern journals, however, were slow to recognize its import, and they delayed for several weeks—some for awas January 11, and its first article was on January 19; the Journal's first article on January 25; the Advertiser's on January 30; the Courier's, a very brief one, on February 9. All the editorial matter concerning the measure in the last-named jouy be mentioned, sent no reply to the invitation to address the first anti-Nebraska meeting held in Broadway Tabernacle, January 30. Mr. Everett made a speech, February 8, against the bill. He contended that the Compromise of 1850, which he had ad indignation were general. The first important popular protest came from a meeting of the business men of New York, January 30, most of whom had supported the Compromise of 1850, held in the Broadway Tabernacle. Among the letters read at the mee
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
Brutus. This passage. at Butler's request, was suppressed or modified in the Congressional Globe. It was severely condemned by the Northern press. New York Times, January 31; New York Herald, January 31 and February 2; New York Tribune, January 30; New York Evening Post, January 30, 31: New York Independent, February 5. James Buchanan, President-elect, who had arrived in Washington, took pains of his own motion to attend the funeral. although his presence had not been arranged for in tJanuary 30, 31: New York Independent, February 5. James Buchanan, President-elect, who had arrived in Washington, took pains of his own motion to attend the funeral. although his presence had not been arranged for in the official programme. (J. S. Pike in the New York Tribune, February 2.) Brooks had been his partisan in the election of 1856, and Buchanan had been an apologist for the assault. (Wilson's History, vol. II. p. 490: Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 276.) Wilson was indignant that Savage's insult was not instantly repelled in the house; and he intended to brand it as cowardly in the Senate if he could get an opportunity. The weakness of De Witt of Massachusetts. who accepted service on the committ