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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
the United States Navy. He was at one time Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography in the Navy Department, and was popularly known for his successful interference while in command of the St. Louis, in the harbor of Smyrna, resulting in the release from a Turkish prison of Martin Koszta, a Hungarian refugee who had declared his intention of becoming a citizen of the United States.--editors. agreed with me, and immediately ordered the attack. It took place on the early morning of January 31st. The Powhatan and Canandaigua were absent at the time, coaling, at Port Royal.--editors. The Palmetto State, on board of which, for the occasion, was Commodore Ingraham himself, steamed out directly toward the Federal fleet, followed by the Chicora, and fell upon and fired into the steamer Mercedita before the latter had fully realized the peril she was in. Disabled and reported to be sinking, the Mercedita immediately surrendered. The Palmetto State left her and went in pursuit of tw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
o ready to join hands with him. The plain people of that country were steadfastly our friends, a fact we should never forget. The Navy Department had formed extravagant ideas of the power and invulnerability of what Mr. Fox called these marvelous vessels, ideas not fully shared, while they were in their tentative and undeveloped state, by their great designer, as may be seen in his paper on the monitor class of vessels in The century magazine for December, 1885. [See p. 31.] On the 31st of January the Secretary of the Navy had sent the following hedging letter to Admiral Du Pont, a letter contradictory in its terms, but declaring that the necessity for the capture of Charleston had become imperative, and that the department would share tile responsibility with commanders who made the attempt: Sir: Your confidential dispatch, No. 36, dated the 14th instant, has been received. The department does not desire to urge an attack upon Charleston with inadequate means; and if