Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for January 31st or search for January 31st in all documents.

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Doc. 63.-treatment of Southerners. General W. T. Sherman's letter. headquarters Department of the Tennessee, Vicksburgh, January 31. Major R. M. Sawyer, A. A. General, Army of the Tennessee, Huntsville: dear Sawyer: In my former letter I have answered all your questions save one, and that relates to the treatment of inhabitants, known or suspected to be hostile, or secesh. This is in truth the most difficult business of our army, as it advances and occupies the Southern country. It is almost impossible to lay down rules, and I invariably leave this whole subject to the local commanders, but am willing to give them the benefit of my acquired knowledge and experience. In Europe, whence we derive our principles of war, as developed by their histories, wars are between kings or rulers, through hired armies, and not between peoples. These remain, as it were, neutral, and sell their produce to whatever army is in possession. Napoleon, when at war with Prussia, Austria,
had in contemplation the occupation of Florida on the west bank of the St. John's River at a very early day. Under date of January twenty-second, you informed that in regard to my proposed operations in Florida, the Secretary replied that the matter had been left entirely to my judgment and discretion, with the means at my command, and that as the object of the proposed expedition had not been explained, it was impossible for you to judge of its advantages or practicability. On January thirty-first, I wrote informing you that the objects to be attained by the operations were: 1. To procure an outlet for cotton, lumber, timber, etc. 2. To cut off one of the enemy's sources of commissary supplies, etc. 3. To obtain recruits for any colored regiments. 4. To inaugurate measures for the speedy restoration of Florida to her allegiance, in accordance with instructions which I had received from the President by the hands of Major John Hay, Assistant Adjutant-General. On F
Captain Guert Gansevoort. United States iron-clad Roanoke, Newport news, Va., February 4, 1864. Admiral: I have the honor to inform you of the facts (as far as I can recollect) relating to the expedition which went up the river on January thirty-first, under the command of General Graham. Sunday morning, January thirty-first, about ten A. M., three army steamers came up from Fortress Monroe and went near the Minnesota, and shortly after I saw a boat coming toward this vessel with an January thirty-first, about ten A. M., three army steamers came up from Fortress Monroe and went near the Minnesota, and shortly after I saw a boat coming toward this vessel with an army lieutenant (whose name I do not remember) and Lieutenant Commander Gillis. On their arrival, the army lieutenant stated to me that General Graham was going on an expedition, and wanted Lieutenant Commander Gillis to go with him. I referred him to the Admiral, and was informed that he was absent at Norfolk and would not be back until late in the afternoon. I replied that I did not consider that absence; to which they said that, to all intents and purposes, it was absence as far as the expe