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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
been no cessation of the blockade. The attack of the rams disclosed the necessity of a more powerful squadron on the Charleston blockade, and the Navy Department had already taken steps to this end, having also in contemplation an active offensive movement against Charleston. The history of the projected attack on Charleston is given by Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers in a following article. The great broadside iron-clad New Ironsides had already arrived at Port Royal, and during January and February several monitors joined the station. The original Monitor, sent down for the same purpose at the close of December, had foundered off Hatteras, as already related. [See Vol. I., p. 745.] The Montauk and Passaic had reached their destination safely, and they were followed by the Patapsco, Nahant, Weehawken, Catskill, and Nauntucket, and by the experimental iron-clad Keokuk. In view of the contemplated movement, Du Pont desired to give the monitors a preliminary trial, and for this purp
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Kilpatrick's and Dahlgren's raid to Richmond. (search)
This letter being referred to General Kilpatrick, he replied substantially as in his previous report, adding, however, that the photographic papers do not contain the indorsement referred to as having been placed by me on Colonel Dahlgren's papers. Colonel Dahlgren received no orders from me to pillage, burn, or kill, nor were any suet instructions given me by my superiors. This letter was inclosed by General Meade to General <*>ee with the statement that neither the United States Government, myself, nor General Kilpatrick authorized, sanctioned, or approved the burning of the city of Richmond and the killing of Mr. Davis and his cabinet, nor any other act not required by military necessity and in accordance with the usages of war. Camp of the 18th Pennsylvania cavalry, Kilpatrick's division, on the Union left, between the Rappahannock and the Rapidan (February or March, 1864). from a photograph. Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac at Brandy Station. From a photograph.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opening of the Atlanta campaign. (search)
rn Mountain, which are merely a prolongation of Chattooga Mountains, and capable of impregnable defense. These gaps were well known to both armies. Through them ran public roads, and soldiers of both armies had marched through both. Late in February Dug Gap had been seized by an Indiana regiment and held until Cleburne retook it. As early as February General Thomas, knowing that at that time Snake Creek Gap was unguarded, proposed a campaign, the plan being to attract General Johnston's attFebruary General Thomas, knowing that at that time Snake Creek Gap was unguarded, proposed a campaign, the plan being to attract General Johnston's attention by a demonstration on Buzzard Roost, and to throw the main body of the army through Snake Creek Gap, and cut his communications between Dalton and the Oostenaula. Neither of these gaps was fortified, and on May 5th, when the campaign opened, Dug Gap was guarded by a small command of Arkansas troops under Colonel Williamson, numbering perhaps 250, while Snake Creek Gap was left wholly unprotected. At Resaca, where the railroad crosses the Oostenaula, Cantey's brigade was held on the ev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Ill., Col. Jason Marsh, Lieut.-Col. John B. Kerr, Capt. Thomas J. Bryan; 88th Ill., Lieut.-Col. George W. Chandler, Lieut.-Col. George W. Smith; 28th Ky., Transferred to Second Brigade May 28th. Lieut.-Col. J. Rowan Boone, Maj. George W. Barth; 2d Mo., Remained at Dalton from May 14th. Lieut.-Col. Arnold Beck, Col. Bernard Laiboldt; 15th Mo., Col. Joseph Conrad; 24th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Theodore S. West, Maj. Arthur MacArthur, Jr. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George D. Wagner, Col. John W. Blak Frederick Jaensch, Lieut.-Col. S. P. Simpson; 32d Mo., Capt. Charles C. Bland, Maj. Abraham J. Seay. Artillery, Chiefs of corps artillery: Major C. J. Stolbrand, Major Allen C. Waterhouse, Major Thomas D. Maurice. Maj. Clemens Landgraeber: F, 2d Mo., Capt. Louis Voelkner, Lieut. Lewis A. Winn; 4th Ohio, Capt. Geo. Froehlich, Lieut. Lewis Zimmerer. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Morgan L. Smith, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Brig.-Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, Brig.-Gen. Will
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in Arkansas, April 20, 1864. (search)
Third Brigade, Col. Adolph Engelmann: 43d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Adolph Dengler; 40th Iowa, Col. John A. Garrett; 27th Wis., Col. Conrad Krez. Artillery: Ill. Battery, Capt. T. F. Vaughn; 3d Iowa, Lieut. M. C. Wright; K, 1st Mo., Capt. James Marr; E, 2d Mo., Lieut. Charles Peetz. frontier division, Brig.-Gen. John M. Thayer. First Brigade, Col. John Edwards: 1st Ark., Lieut.-Col. E. J. Searle; 2d Ark., Maj. M. L. Stephenson; 18th Iowa, Capt. William M. Duncan; 2d Ind. Battery, Lieut. Hugh Espey.aj. Julius G. Fisk; 6th Kan., Lieut.-Col. William T. Campbell; 14th Kan., Lieut.-Col. John G. Brown. cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Eugene A. Carr. First Brigade, Col. John F. Ritter: 3d Ark., Maj. George F. Lovejoy; 1st Mo., Capt. Miles Kehoe; 2d Mo., Capt. William H. Higdon; 13th Ill. and 3d Iowa (detachment), Capt. Adolph Bechaud. Third Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Joseph W. Caldwell: 1st Iowa, Capt. James P. Crosby; 10th Ill. (detachment), Lieut. R. J. Bellamy; 3d Mo., Maj. John A. Lennon. inde
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
re its full share of the work, and met with heavy losses. The West Gulf squadron, after Farragut's retirement from the command in September, 1864, had been under the direction of Commodore James S. Palmer, who was in turn relieved at the end of February by Acting Rear-Admiral Henry K. Thatcher. Palmer, however, an officer of great energy and skill, continued to serve with the squadron. Admiral Thatcher took personal direction of the closing operations against Mobile in cooperation with Genera the surrender of Lieutenant J. H. Carter and the Confederate naval forces under his command in the Red River. On the west Gulf coast the blockade continued until the end, several important cutting-out expeditions occurring during January and February. Among these the most noteworthy were the capture of the Delphina, January 22d, in Calcasieu River, by Lieutenant-Commander R. W. Meade; of the Pet and the Anna Sophia, February 7th, at Galveston, by an expedition organized by Commander J. R. M
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
Sylvester G. Hill, Col. William R. Marshall: 12th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John H. Stibbs; 35th Iowa, Maj. William Dill, Capt. Abraham N. Snyder; 7th Minn., Col. William R. Marshall, Lieut.-Col. George Bradley; 33d Mo., Lieut.-Col. William H. Heath; I, 2d Mo. Art'y, Capt. Stephen H. Julian. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 133 == 145. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Kenner Garrard. First Brigade, Col. David Moore: 119th Ill., Col. Thomas J. Kinney; 122d Ill., Lieut.-Col. James F. Drish; 89th Ind., Lieut.-Col.. Brigade loss: w, 3. Second Brigade, Col. Leander Blanden: 81st 111., Lieut.-Col. Andrew W. Rogers; 95th Ill., Lieut.-Col. William Avery; 44th Mo., Lieut.-Col. Andrew J. Barr. Brigade loss: w, 1. Artillery: 14th Ind., Capt. Francis W. Morse; A, 2d Mo., Lieut. John Zepp. Artillery loss: k, 1. Provisional detachment, Maj.-Gen. James B. Steedman. Provisional division, Composed mainly of detachments belonging to the 14th, 15th, 17th, and 20th corps, which had been unable to rejoin their p
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
crossing the mountains. It is difficult to imagine a more disagreeable duty for a mounted soldier than marching over sleety, slushy, snowy or icy roads in winter, and bivouacking without the means of protection. It is demoralizing to men and ruinous to horses. After the failure of these expeditions no further movements were attempted in the Valley, and most of the infantry of Sheridan's army was sent either to the Army of the Potomac at Petersburg, or elsewhere where it was needed. In February Sheridan made arrangements to march from the Valley with the cavalry with a view to interrupting and destroying, as far as possible, the lines of supply through central Virginia. After accomplishing this it was intended that he should either move west of Richmond and join Sherman's army, or return to the Valley, or join Meade's army in front of Petersburg, as might be most practicable. February 27th the movement commenced, the command consisting of two superb divisions of cavalry which ha
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
stained little or no damage. The greatest damage this vessel sustained was from a 200-pounder Parrott that struck on the fantail forward and cut our anchor chain, and the jar, it is supposed, started her leaking. We got under way Tuesday evening, but found the Virginia's exhaust-pipe and smoke stack were so riddled as to fill the gun-deck with smoke and steam, which was the cause of our returning. The whole blame rests with the two pilots of the Virginia. editors. About the middle of February Commodore Mitchell was replaced in the command of the James River squadron by Admiral Semmes, lately the commander of the Alabama. During the six weeks that followed there was very little that the squadron could do. The obstructions at Trent's Reach had been strengthened, and additions had been made to the fleet below. Meantime the Union armies were closing in about Richmond, and at length the fall of the city was inevitable. On the 2d of April, in obedience to orders from Secretary Mall