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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ed Artillery. The vessel was by the Confederates called Virginia. She was put in commission during the last week of February, but continued crowded with mechanics until the eve of the fight. She was badly ventilated, very uncomfortable, and ver gave equal evidence that the divine spark in their natures was indeed a living fire. Editorial Paragraphs. our February and March numbers are combined under one cover for the convenience of the Secretary, who expects to be absent from his oeed in their efforts. General Fitzhugh Lee (accompanied by the Secretary) expects to start on the 19th of this month (February) on his second lecturing tour in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. The programme of lectures as now arrangedecked effectually the cavalry expeditions sent out by Sheridan. Matters were now rapidly hastening to an end. Late in February Sheridan set out from Winchester with 10,000 sabres, and moved up the Valley. Early attempted, with the 1,200 or 1,300
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
the army. The crew, 320 in number, were obtained with great difficulty. With few exceptions they were volunteers from the army; most of them were landsmen. Their deficiencies were as much as possible overcome by the zeal and intelligence of the officers; a list of them is appended. In the fight one of the nine-inch guns was manned by a detachment of the Norfolk United Artillery. The vessel was by the Confederates called Virginia. She was put in commission during the last week of February, but continued crowded with mechanics until the eve of the fight. She was badly ventilated, very uncomfortable, and very unhealthy. There was an average of fifty or sixty at the hospital, in addition to the sick-list on board. The Flag-Officer, Franklin Buchanan, was detained in Richmond in charge of an important bureau, from which he was only relieved a few days before the fight. There was no captain; the ship was commissioned and equipped by the Executive and Ordnance Officer, who h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Editorial Paragraphs. our February and March numbers are combined under one cover for the convenience of the Secretary, who expects to be absent from his office from the 19th of February until the 16th of March, but we are sure our readers will not object as they get their full quota of pages, and a number of great variety and interest. renewals have been coming in quite briskly, but a large number of our subscribers have forgotten this important matter and we beg them to attend to it aeciprocate their words of encouragement. We hail all such organizations as co-workers in a common cause, and bid them God-speed in their efforts. General Fitzhugh Lee (accompanied by the Secretary) expects to start on the 19th of this month (February) on his second lecturing tour in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. The programme of lectures as now arranged is as follows: Knoxville, February 20th; Montgomery, February 22d; Mobile, February 23d; New Orleans, February 26th; Hous
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
ere at an end for the season, the mass of Early's troops were withdrawn by General Lee to Petersburg. About the same time General Grant withdrew a large part of Sheridan's infantry to the same place. Early removed his headquarters to Staunton, and kept his cavalry busy during the winter in making dashes at exposed posts and at the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. He also checked effectually the cavalry expeditions sent out by Sheridan. Matters were now rapidly hastening to an end. Late in February Sheridan set out from Winchester with 10,000 sabres, and moved up the Valley. Early attempted, with the 1,200 or 1,300 men he had, to stop him at Rockfish Gap. The Federals attacked the Confederates, however, at Waynesboroa before they had fallen back into the gap, and quickly routed, rode down and captured the greater part of this handful of troops. Sheridan's command in the Valley was marked by excessive barbarity. Not only was Grant's order for the wholesale destruction of private
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
een brought under obligations to W. W. Peabody, General Superintendent of the Ohio and Mississippi, and renewed obligations to Colonel Hoxie, of the Missouri Pacific, and all the lines of the great Goul system; M. H. Smith, Vice President of the splendid Louisville and Nashville railway; and Henry Fink, Vice President and General Manager of the superb line from Memphis to Norfolk, for highly appreciated courtesies over their lines. And we desire gratefully to record that in travelling in February and March, from Richmond to New Orleans, Galveston, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Corsicana, Dallas, Little Rock, Memphis, Nashville, Louisville and back to Richmond by the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad, and recently to Louisville, St. Louis, Waco, Dallas, Memphis and back home by the Memphis and Charleston, East Tennessee and Georgia, Norfolk and Western, and Richmond and Danville railroads, we met with no accident, suffered no serious detention, encountered nothing but politeness on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
shell set fire to several houses at the Navy Yard, silenced several of our land batteries, and came near demolishing Fort McRea. Be the enemy's damage slight as he represented it, it is pregnant with meaning, when he failed to renew the bombardment on the morning of the 24th, after boastfully commencing it two days previous. The Army under General Albert Sidney Johnston at Corinth and Shiloh—General Bragg's forces remained in the successful defence of Pensacola and the Navy Yard, until February or early in March, when the disasters of Fort Donaldson on the Cumberland, and Henry on the Tennessee rivers, together with the evacuation by our forces, and the occupation by the enemy of Southern Kentucky, Middle and West Tennessee, and North Alabama, resulted in a concentration of all our available force under Albert Sidney Johnston, along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, General Johnston, with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ke a rock of old ocean, it had received, and broken, and hurled back into the deep in bloody foam those swiftly succeeding waves of four years of incessant battle; but now the rock itself was wearing away, and still the waves came on. A new enemy was approaching the sturdy devoted band. In September, 1864, Atlanta fell, and through Georgia to the sea, with fire and sword, swept the victorious columns of Sherman. In January, 1865, the head of the column had been turned northward; and in February, Columbia and Charleston shared the fate that had already befallen Savannah. Yes, a new enemy was approaching the Army of Northern Virginia, and this time in the rear. The homes of the soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Southern States were now in ashes. Wives, mothers and sisters were wanderers under the wintry skies, flying from the invaders who smote and spared not in their relentless march. Is it wonder that hearts that had never quailed before bayonet or blade beat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
ectfully submit for your consideration a few facts in regard to the feed furnished the stock of this battalion. I have been in the Tennessee army since last November and can truly say during the whole of that time the stock of my command has not been half fed. In some instances the horses going for two days at a time without anything to eat. Rotten corn, half rations at that, with no fodder in December and January. Full rations of corn and one pound of fodder, sometimes, (bad at that) in February and March. I have just received a good lot of horses, which I cannot keep in condition unless I get something to feed them on. I have my horses as well groomed and otherwise cared for as can be, but good grooming and other necessary attention will not feed them. Corn alone will not keep horses in condition; they will not eat rations of corn if no long feed is furnished. Horses fed with corn alone are more liable to disease, and in fact cannot be kept healthy. It is a shame to drain