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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ordered by the court that the prosecutions aforesaid be dismissed. Strange to say, an order was entered upon the 1st of February, reciting that inasmuch as the indictments had been dismissed, he and his bondsmen were forever released. The motot signed it, was a drinking man, and his bids were generally too high. Thomas McKnight, of New York, under date of February 1st, offered to furnish the State with arms, saying he and his associates had furnished them to Georgia, Alabama and Missiunderstanding with the authorities at Washington as to the conditions upon which they would be allowed to proceed. On February 1st, Major Thomas T. Eckert, who had been sent with instructions from Mr. Lincoln as to the request of the commissioners, to all the details of the correspondence between the commissioners and Major Eckert, it is sufficient to state that on February 1st, he telegraphed to Washington that the reply of the commissioners was not satisfactory and that he had notified them t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ws, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon, W. B. Richards, Jr., J. C. Breckinridge, and Jefferson Davis. ´╝łtwo cases.) The District Attorney, by leave of the court, saith that he will not prosecute further on behalf of the United States, against the above-named parties upon separate indictments for treason. It is, therefore, ordered by the court that the prosecutions aforesaid be dismissed. Strange to say, an order was entered upon the 1st of February, reciting that inasmuch as the indictments had been dismissed, he and his bondsmen were forever released. The motion, on appeal in the Supreme Court, of course, was never called, and is now filed amongst its archives. This recitation of the Trials and Trial of Jefferson Davis has not been prepared with the purpose of stirring up sectional animosities or reviving the bitterness of the past. Its aim has been solely to vindicate the truth of history, that its teachings may be taken
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
uskets, etc., the whole amounting to $125,000. Hitchcock also made proposals for doing the work of altering the State's muskets at Newbern and to make bullets and cartridges near there; shipments of articles above referred to be made from New York to Norfolk, Newbern or Wilmington. Lieutenant Lee made an adverse endorsement on Hitchcock's proposal, saying the latter had not signed it, was a drinking man, and his bids were generally too high. Thomas McKnight, of New York, under date of February 1st, offered to furnish the State with arms, saying he and his associates had furnished them to Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. He offered Colt's revolvers at from $18 to $25; minie muskets, to use either cap or Maynard primer, for $13; United States rifles, with sword bayonets, $21; Sharp's breech-loading rifles, $40, and carbines, $30. February 2d, Governor Ellis ordered 50,000 pounds of lead from McKnight, of New York, at 5 1/2, to be delivered at Wilmington, N. C. He said: I wish to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
re received by General Grant with marked civility and courtesy and remained with him two days before they could arrive at an understanding with the authorities at Washington as to the conditions upon which they would be allowed to proceed. On February 1st, Major Thomas T. Eckert, who had been sent with instructions from Mr. Lincoln as to the request of the commissioners, addressed to them a letter, in which he informed them that if they passed through the United States military lines, it would rmal conference on the basis of a paper prepared by Mr. Lincoln, a copy of which was placed in their hands. Without going into all the details of the correspondence between the commissioners and Major Eckert, it is sufficient to state that on February 1st, he telegraphed to Washington that the reply of the commissioners was not satisfactory and that he had notified them that they could not proceed further unless they complied with the conditions expressed in Mr. Lincoln's letter. On February 2