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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
follows: Ross's Texas brigade was guarding the Yazoo river and Mississippi Central railroad, posted at Benton. Starke's Mississippi brigade was at Brownsville, watching the crossings of the Big Black, opposite Vicksburg. Adams's brigade was moved from the vicinity of Natchez to Raymond. About the 28th of January the enemy commenced their demonstrations up Yazoo river with their boats, and moved their cavalry up towards Mechanicksburg. Their demonstrations continued daily to the 5th of February, and were handsomely met by the gallant Texans under Ross, fighting their gun boats and infantry, and repulsing them on every occasion. At Liverpool two small regiments and a section of artillery of King's battery, under Lieutenant Moore, repulsed three large regiments of infantry of the enemy, supported by their gun boats. The enemy charged in gallant style, and were repulsed twice; the second time the Texans using their six-shooters at twenty paces. The two regiments were the Six
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's campaign in Mississippi in winter of 1864. (search)
, Lieutenant Wilson and eight men. I next took position on the Bolton and Clinton road, one mile from that just relinquished. The enemy advanced in four lines of battle across the field I had just left, but did not advance beyond Baker's Creek that evening. Throwing out a strong picket and numerous scouts on my front and flanks, I withdrew my command one mile, to Mr. Thomas's plantation, where I fed my horses and encamped for the night. Before daylight on the morning of the 5th of February, I resumed my position, directing Captain King to train his rifled pieces on the bridge over Baker's Creek, eight hundred yards in my front, and posted Colonel Griffith's Arkansas regiment on the right, and Major Stockdale's battalion on the left, both dismounted as supports for the artillery. I held Colonel Wood and Colonel Dumontiel in reserve — the former dismounted and forming a second line — the latter mounted and in column in the road. At 7 A. M., the enemy advanced in column ac