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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 242 242 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 5 5 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for February 6th or search for February 6th in all documents.

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the carriage-house over the way, and desired to search it out. This carriage-house, it is proper to state, was used as a receptacle for boxes and goods, sent to prisoners from the North, and the recipients were often allowed to go, under guard, across the street to secure their property. Captain Gallagher was granted permission to go there, and as he walked across under guard, he, as well as he could, paced off the distance, and concluded that the street was about fifty feet wide. On the sixth or seventh of February, the working party supposed they had gone a sufficient distance, and commenced to dig upward. When near the surface, they heard the rebel guards talking above them, and discovered they were some two or three feet yet outside the fence. The displacing of a stone made considerable noise, and one of the sentinels called to his comrade and asked him what the noise meant. The guards, after listening a few minutes, concluded that nothing was wrong, and returned to their
herman. Vicksburgh, February 27, via Cairo, March 10, 1864. Lieutenant-General Grant, care of Major-General Halleck: General: I got in this morning from Canton, where I left my army in splendid heart and condition. We reached Jackson February sixth, crossed the Pearl, and passed through Brandon to Morton, where the enemy made dispositions for battle, but fled in the night. We posted on over all obstacles, and reached Meridian February fourteenth. General Polk, having a railroad to assififth, marched to-day fifteen miles, and camped two miles west of Jackson. Had sharp skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry, losing some seven men killed, thirty wounded, and thirteen prisoners. The enemy's loss was much heavier than ours. February sixth, marched into Jackson. The Iowa brigade cross Pearl River, and take the advance. March of five miles. February seventh, messengers from Big Black came through last night with despatches for General Sherman and found the enemy already in