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ct of the states in surrendering public lands to the federal union. At the opening of the year 1780, congress found itself utterly helpless, and threw everything upon the states. In truth, there was nothing else that it could do. On the ninth of February, it fixed the Feb. 9. number of men necessary for the service of the year at thirty-five thousand two hundred and eleven, and required the states to furnish by drafts or otherwise, before the first day of the coming April, the respective dFeb. 9. number of men necessary for the service of the year at thirty-five thousand two hundred and eleven, and required the states to furnish by drafts or otherwise, before the first day of the coming April, the respective deficiencies in their quotas, which were prescribed with exactness. But troops need to be subsisted: congress called on the several states to furnish their respective quotas of supplies for the ensuing season; thus shoving off from itself all care for recruiting the army, and all responsibility for its support. To gain money, it directed the states to bring into the continental treasury, by taxes or otherwise, one million two hundred and fifty thousand dollars every month to the month of April,
in bondage. There were no poor, and none marked from others by their apparel or their dwellings. Everywhere appeared the same simplicity and neatness. The elders watched over the members of the congregation, and incurable wrong-doers were punished by expulsion. After their hours of toil came the hour of prayer, exhortations, and the singing of psalms and hymns. Under their well-directed labor on a bountiful soil, in a genial clime, the wilderness blossomed like the Chap. XXIII.} 1781. Feb. 9. rose. Dumas, i. 93, 97. While Cornwallis rested for the night near Salem, at the distance of five and twenty miles the two divisions of the American army effected their junction at Guilford court-house. The united force was too weak to offer battle; a single neglect or mistake would have proved its ruin. Carrington of Virginia, the wise selection of Greene for his quarter-master, advised to cross the Dan twenty miles below Dix's ferry at the ferries of Irwin and Boyd, which were se